English version

nagging

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishnaggingnag‧ging /ˈnæɡɪŋ/ adjective [only before noun]  1 CONTINUOUSmaking you worry or feel pain slightly all the timenagging feeling/doubt/suspicion etc There was still a nagging doubt in the back of her mind. Lee had a nagging pain in her back.2 always complaining a nagging wife
Examples from the Corpus
naggingI can't seem to shake off this nagging cold.In everything he did there was a touch of charisma, and, following everything he did, a nagging doubt.There are still some nagging doubts about the future of the company, though for now it is doing well.The post-war years brought nagging doubts for Mary, when she was not surrounded by her now four healthy children.I sound like a nagging father.I have a nagging feeling that I forgot to do something.It's sometimes worth asking that nagging little voice what is really the worst thing that can happen now?But there is no nagging sense of anachronism.But I have this nagging suspicion that my luck as a first-timer tour group leader can not hold.There was abdominal pain without a doubt and that nagging temperature of 102.5° - that was damn like a wire.She had a nagging worry that she hadn't done enough to prepare.nagging feeling/doubt/suspicion etcHer kinship with the respected Goldie apparently quells any nagging doubts.In everything he did there was a touch of charisma, and, following everything he did, a nagging doubt.This is always a nagging doubt about any survey-style research.But McClellan was beginning to have nagging doubts about his ability to capture the Confederate capital.The nagging suspicion of sleight of hand merely adds to her mystique.But in the absence of definite proof, nagging doubts remained.But I have this nagging suspicion that my luck as a first-timer tour group leader can not hold.I had a nagging feeling they also had seen more.

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