English version

next to

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishnext toˈnext to ●●● S3 W3 preposition πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 very close to someone or something, with no other person, building, place etc in between πŸ”Š There was a little girl sitting next to him.2 β†’ next to nothing3 used to give a list of things you like, hate etc in order to say what is first on the list πŸ”Š Next to soccer, I like playing tennis best.4 in comparison with someone or something πŸ”Š Next to her, I’m a very poor cook.5 β†’ next to impossible/useless etcTHESAURUSnext to preposition very close to someone or something, with no other person, building, place etc in betweenI sat next to him at dinner.The hotel was right next to the airport.beside preposition next to the side of someone or somethingElla came and sat down beside me.They were sitting beside the pool.by preposition next to something – often used about being very close to a window, door, or the edge of something such as an area of waterI saw him standing by the window.Weymouth is a pretty little town by the sea.She lives by the river.next door adverb in the building or room next to yours, or next to another oneThe house next door is much bigger than ours.Have you met the people who’ve just moved in next door?alongside adverb, preposition close to the side of something, especially a river, railway, boat, or vehicleI decided to take the path alongside the railway track.A police car pulled up alongside.adjacent adjective, adverb formal a building, room, or piece of land that is adjacent to another one is next to itThey walked through a rose garden adjacent to the hospital.The blaze spread to two adjacent buildings.adjoining adjective formal an adjoining room, building, or piece of land is one that is next to another one and is joined to itWe had adjoining rooms at the hotel.
Examples from the Corpus
next toβ€’ He led them, a procession of six, to a table right next to a platform.β€’ In one city, contaminated waste was dumped next to a shopping centre.β€’ You want to keep the two columns next to each other, no matter how much text is added or deleted.β€’ And that was at home next to her.β€’ His parents were laid out next to him.β€’ He slept next to his junie, fanning her with a magazine in the middle of the night.β€’ Iron gates open to a courtyard filled with pots of geraniums and ivy tucked next to rusted bistro tables and chairs.