English version

no way

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishno wayˌno ˈway adverb spoken  NOused to emphasize that you will not agree or be able to do something ‘Are you going to offer to work over the weekend?’ ‘No way!’ No way will we be finished by five o'clock. There’s no way I’m going to pay £500 just for a weekend in Paris.
Examples from the Corpus
no wayThere was absolutely no way I could have qualified otherwise.And there was no way, no way that I was going to become like Michael.There is, of course, no way to know for sure.There’s no wayBut first I have to get the Christmas season over. There's no way of avoiding it.No, it's twaddle. There's no way that shaving can stimulate the hair roots to work harder.Female speaker There's no way you can come to terms with it.
no way!no way!a) NOREFUSEused to say that you will definitely not do or allow something ‘Can I borrow your car?’ ‘No way!’ There’s no way I’ll ever get married again.No way José! (=used to emphasize that you will not do something) b) especially American EnglishSURPRISED used to say that you do not believe something or are very surprised by it She’s 45? No way! way
Examples from the Corpus
There’s no wayBut first I have to get the Christmas season over. There's no way of avoiding it.Female speaker There's no way you can come to terms with it.No, it's twaddle. There's no way that shaving can stimulate the hair roots to work harder.
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