Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1300-1400
Origin: Perhaps from Low German

nod

1 verb
     
nod1 W2 past tense and past participle nodded, present participle nodding [intransitive and transitive]
1 to move your head up and down, especially in order to show agreement or understanding [↪ shake]:
I asked her if she was ready to go, and she nodded.
Mom nodded her head sympathetically.
nod your approval/agreement etc (=show your approval etc by nodding)
Corbett nodded his acceptance.
2 to move your head down and up again once in order to greet someone or give someone a sign to do something
nod at
The judge nodded at the foreman to proceed.
nod to
She nodded to us as she walked by.
3

have a nodding acquaintance (with something)

to know a little about a subject but not a lot:
Students will need to have a nodding acquaintance with Spanish.
4

have a nodding acquaintance (with somebody)

also be on nodding terms (with somebody) British English to know someone but not very well

nod off

phrasal verb
to begin to sleep, usually when you do not intend to and are sitting somewhere:
I missed the movie because I kept nodding off.

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