Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1200-1300
Language: Old French
Origin: obeir, from Latin oboedire, from audire 'to hear'

obey

verb
     
o‧bey [intransitive and transitive]
to do what someone in authority tells you to do, or what a law or rule says you must do [≠ disobey]:
The little boy made no effort to obey.
'Sit!' he said, and the dog obeyed him instantly.
obey an order/command
Soldiers are expected to obey orders without questioning them.
obey the law/rules
Failure to obey the law can lead to a large fine.
! Do not say 'obey to' someone or something. Obey must be followed directly by a noun: He refused to obey their orders (NOT He refused to obey to their orders).

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