English version

observable

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishobservableob‧ser‧va‧ble /əbˈzɜːvəbəl $ -ɜːr-/ adjective  NOTICEsomething that is observable can be seen or noticednoticeable an observable change in behaviourobservably adverb
Examples from the Corpus
observableWithin a few weeks of birth, initial accommodations on the part of the child are usually observable.It refers to observable behaviors-sensorimotor and conceptual-that reflect intellectual activity.If it is to have any practical value a recording system must be concerned with measuring observable behaviour.The chips are indeed observable, but the difference between them is not.This may provide the first observable category of classroom behaviour for a workable schedule.According to others it was more properly a generic term used loosely to cover a wide assortment of observable cutaneous conditions.Then the observable quantity, the orbital decay rate. is.Primary qualities belong not only to observable substances such as gold, but also to the minute corpuscles which make them up.the observable universe
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