English version

oh

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishohoh /əʊ $ / interjection  1 ATTENTIONused when you want to get someone’s attention or continue what you are saying Oh, look, I think that’s Harry over there. Milk, cereal, juice – oh, and put lettuce on the list too.2 used when you are giving an answer to a question ‘Have you met his wife?’ ‘Oh, yes, I know her quite well.’ ‘I hope Jenny won’t be angry.’ ‘Oh, no, don’t worry about that.’oh, okay/all right ‘Can you lend me ten pounds?’ ‘Oh, all right, but only until tomorrow.’3 PAUSEused to make a slight pause when you are speaking I met your friend in town, oh, what’s her name?4 FEEL HAPPY/FRIGHTENED/BORED ETCused to show that you are very happy, angry, disappointed etc about something Oh, aren’t those flowers gorgeous! Oh, how awful! Oh, no! I’ve left my keys in the car!oh, good/great Oh, good, you’re still here.oh, God/oh, dear etc Oh, God, I forgot all about it! Oh, well, never mind.5 NOT KNOWused to show that you are surprised about something ‘Frances has left her husband, you know.’ ‘Oh, has she?’ Oh, I didn’t know that.
Examples from the Corpus
ohOh, and don't forget to turn off the lights on your way out.She's worked there for, oh, around twelve years.Oh, be quiet!Oh, what a great idea!
OHOHthe written abbreviation of Ohio