Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

onto

preposition
     
on‧to S1 W2 also on to
1 used to say that someone or something moves to a position on a surface, area, or object:
She watched him walk onto the platform.
Don't jump onto (=into) the bus while it's moving.
Pour the syrup on to the egg mixture.
The car rolled over onto its side.
down/out/up etc onto something
Let's get back onto the highway.
2 used to say that a room, door, or window faces towards something or allows movement into another place:
The dining room looks out onto a pretty garden.
a gate leading on to a broad track
3

be onto somebody

informal
a) also get onto somebody especially British English to speak to someone in order to tell them or ask them something:
A number of people have been onto me complaining about the noise.
Get onto the Press Office and find out what's happening.
b) to know that a particular person did something wrong or committed a crime:
The police are onto him.
4

be onto something

informal
a) to have discovered or produced something new and interesting:
With the new show, we were onto something big.
be onto a good thing/a winner
I think she's onto a real winner with this song.
b) also get onto something to be dealing with something or start dealing with something:
I'll get onto it right away.

Dictionary pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
What is the word for picture 1? What is the word for picture 2? What is the word for picture 3? What is the word for picture 4?
Click on any of the pictures above to find out what it is called.

Explore our topic dictionary