English version

ouster

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishousterous‧ter /ˈaʊstə $ -ər/ noun [uncountable] American English 🔊 🔊 GET RID OFwhen someone is removed from a position of power or from a competition – used in news reportssomebody’s ouster/the ouster of somebody 🔊 the ouster of the brutal dictatorship
Examples from the Corpus
ousterIn fact Jeffries' ouster provoked not a ripple in Harlem, and nothing more dangerous than a rally on campus.The cases on ouster clauses and tribunals were irrelevant to clauses excluding appeal from the High Court.Havel's ouster came as a shock to everybody.Another important type of statutory ouster clause are clauses which set a time-limit on judicial review.Did she manipulate the ouster of White House travel office personnel so her pals could get the job?Nor would he send them letters announcing their ouster.somebody’s ouster/the ouster of somebodyDid she manipulate the ouster of White House travel office personnel so her pals could get the job?President Luis Echeverra, upset at the paper's critical tone, orchestrated the ouster of its editor, Julio Scherer.
From Longman Business Dictionaryousterous‧ter /ˈaʊstə-ər/ noun [countable] American English journalism an act of removing someone from a powerful job, position etc in order to take their placeThe board faced an ouster by shareholders after it rejected a $55-a-share offer.
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