English version

panic

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishpanicpan‧ic1 /ˈpænɪk/ ●●○ S3 noun  1 [countable usually singular, uncountable]FRIGHTENED a sudden strong feeling of fear or nervousness that makes you unable to think clearly or behave sensiblyin (a) panic The children fled in panic. a feeling of sheer panic (=complete panic) She got into a panic when she couldn’t find the tickets. The whole nation is in a state of panic following the attacks. She suffers from terrible panic attacks.see thesaurus at fear2 [countable usually singular, uncountable]WORRIED a situation in which people are suddenly made very anxious, and make quick decisions without thinking carefullypanic over/about the recent panic over the safety of baby milkpanic buying/selling a wave of panic selling in Hong Kong3 [singular] especially British EnglishSHORT TIME a situation in which you have a lot to do and not much time to do it inrush the usual last minute panic just before the deadline4 panic stationsCOLLOCATIONSverbsthere was (a) panicWhen the shooting started, there was panic.cause panicThe earthquake caused widespread panic.feel panicHe felt a mild panic.get into a panicThere’s no need to get into a panic.throw/send somebody into a panicThe innocent question threw her into a panic.panic breaks out (=starts among a group of people)Suddenly, everything went dark and panic broke out.panic sets in (=starts)Before panic could set in, she realised that the clock was fast.panic ensues formal (=happens after something else happens)Panic ensued as people ran out of the burning building.panic rises within somebody (=someone starts to feel panic)She felt panic rising within her.panic spreads (=starts to affect more people in more places)Panic spread as news of the invasion reached Paris.adjectivesa big/huge panicThere was a big panic about the virus last year.growing/mounting/rising panic (=increasing panic)She quickly packed a bag, trying all the time to control her mounting panic.total/sheer panicA wave of total panic swept across her.blind panic (=a very strong feeling of fear)He ran to the library in blind panic.sudden panicFlorrie exclaimed in sudden panic: ‘I’ve left my bag on the bus!’mild panic (=a slight feeling of panic)There was a note of mild panic in her voice.momentary panic (=panic that does not last long)Her momentary panic faded.phrasesa state of panicShe was in a constant state of panic that he would carry out his threat.a sense/feeling of panicShe looked out to sea with a rising sense of panic.a wave/surge of panic (=a feeling of panic that you suddenly have)A sudden wave of panic overcame him.a panic attackHe had had a panic attack in the street.
Examples from the Corpus
panicAt best, we'd be a laughing stock; at worst, there'd be panic throughout the country.A bomb exploded on the subway, causing panic among rush-hour commuters.I stared round at the dark unfamiliar buildings in panic.Shoppers fled the street in panic after two bombs exploded in central London.Baker had lost a lot of money during the last stock market panic.There would be no panic while he was in charge.I could see the look of panic on her face.Though winded, the impact seemed to startle him into a state of panic.She got into a real panic when she thought she'd lost the tickets.There was a sudden panic and everyone started rushing towards the door.Amid the panic and confusion, police somehow managed to maintain order.When Fred started there, however, with the economy reeling from the panic of 1873, the business was probably smaller.Now, the panic was rolling like a giant wave to the United States.The panic-stricken crowd pushed through the exit, and 10 people were crushed to death.Every April 15th, there's the usual panic of people trying to file their taxes on time.Then there was panic that he'd be released today, when we have a life sentence to bare.panic attacksThirty years ago we heard nothing about panic attacks, or anorexia or self-mutilation.Anxiety can be experienced at various levels ranging from mild feelings of uneasiness to the severe terror that accompanies panic attacks.It has also been proven to combat anxiety, depression, sleep problems, and panic attacks.Before the storm, I was full of anxiety, panic attacks, good and bad days.I still get horrible panic attacks in elevators.It was manifesting itself in insomnia, panic attacks.The panic attacks gave her the perfect excuse, as no blame could possibly be attributed to her.Mrs Carrow would have one of those panic attacks at the very thought.Diazepam may be given for unresponsive panic attacks.panic buying/sellingThere is panic buying of food, air tickets, train tickets, everything.Despite fears of meat shortages, there were no reports of mass panic buying of food.And although Hill-Wood assures them the cash is there, he insists there will be no panic buying.There have also been several periods of panic buying triggered by rumours of taxation or currency reforms.There were even reports from some respondents of panic buying on an old-fashioned scale.On the day before the price liberalization took effect there was a wave of panic buying.Housewives started panic buying of toilet rolls.last minute panicTime to think myself in and out of any last minute panic.
panicpanic2 ●●○ verb (panicked, panicking) [intransitive, transitive]  FRIGHTENEDto suddenly feel so frightened that you cannot think clearly or behave sensibly, or to make someone do this He started to panic when he saw the gun. Don’t panic! We’ll soon get you out of there.panic somebody into doing something The protests became more violent and many people were panicked into leaving the country.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
panicTransvaal captain Jannie Breedt will resist the temptation to panic.When a plane gets into difficulty it is essential that the pilot does not panic.When the parachute didn't open I just panicked.Hold on to that thought and try not to panic.Almost invariably, it is the accused who, unhinged by stress, panics and does crazy, self-destructive things.The soldiers panicked and opened fire on the raiders.The driver apparently panicked and ran off the road.Will they panic at the first sign of trouble?The important thing is not to panic or become impatient because that way you could damage the document.Haminh didn't panic until she was past Corridor 12 and Fox drew close enough behind her to be heard.Lisa panicked when she heard she might be fired.panic somebody into doing somethingAny sudden movement could panic the snake into attacking.
From Longman Business Dictionarypanicpan‧ic1 /ˈpænɪk/ noun [countable, uncountable]1a feeling of great fear and anxiety that makes you act without thinkingThe stock market crash left an air of panic from which many individual investors still haven’t recovered.By announcing future price increases, the administration touched off a consumer panic.2panic buying/selling/trading when people are so anxious or worried about the future that they buy or sell goods, shares etc without thinking carefully firstManila shares plunged 10.9% in panic selling.At a supermarket in Brussels, panic buying got so furious that the managers stopped trying to put sugar, coffee and mineral water on the shelves.panicpanic2 verb (past tense and past participle panicked, present participle panicking) [intransitive, transitive] to suddenly become so frightened and anxious that you do things without thinking clearly, or to make someone do thisFinancial markets panicked, causing a run on the currency (=causing the currency to lose a lot of its value).Crowds of depositors, many panicked by fears they would lose their life savings, formed outside the banks.→ See Verb table
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.
Verb table
panic
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theypanic
he, she, itpanics
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theypanicked
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave panicked
he, she, ithas panicked
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad panicked
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill panic
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have panicked
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam panicking
he, she, itis panicking
> View More
you, we, theyare panicking
Past
I, he, she, itwas panicking
you, we, theywere panicking
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been panicking
he, she, ithas been panicking
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been panicking
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be panicking
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been panicking
> View Less