English version

partisan

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Groupings
partisanpar‧ti‧san1 /ˌpɑːtɪˈzæn $ ˈpɑːrtəzən, -sən/ adjective  1 PPGstrongly supporting a particular political party, plan, or leader, usually without considering the other choices carefully British newspapers are highly partisan.2 relating to the fighting of an armed group against an enemy that has taken control of its country the nature of partisan warfare
Examples from the Corpus
partisanThe probe has lasted for nearly two years and in its final days has split the House into warring partisan camps.Gore was speaking before a partisan crowd of about 500 Democrats.The commended approach to teaching strategies was highly partisan in respect of the particular kinds of practice which were endorsed.To some extent, the resistance to Lee reflects the heightened partisan tension in Washington this fall.Although the King's intentions were not partisan, the consequences were such as to offer very considerable benefit to the Conservative party.He has accused Starr, the independent Whitewater counsel, of conducting a partisan witch hunt.Walsh was accused of everything from being a partisan zealot to an incompetent spendthrift.highly partisanRules is loud, powerful and highly partisan.More often than not, state budgets and other compromises were forged in the Senate, rather than the highly partisan Assembly.The commended approach to teaching strategies was highly partisan in respect of the particular kinds of practice which were endorsed.
Related topics: Groupings, Military
partisanpartisan2 noun [countable]  1 PPGsomeone who strongly supports a political party, plan, or leader a media campaign to represent Democrats as angry partisans2 PPGPMa member of an armed group that fights against an enemy that has taken control of its countrypartisanship noun [uncountable]
Examples from the Corpus
partisanWithout permission, I opened the door and saw him sitting on a chair, guarded by a partisan.Shall I strike at it with my partisan?David Souter, George's boy, was not George W's partisan.The partisan feels that he can trust the stranger, although that trust is tested in future weeks.
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