Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1300-1400
Language: Late Latin
Origin: pharmacia 'giving drugs', from Greek, from pharmakeuein 'to give drugs', from pharmakon 'magic liquid, poison, drug'

pharmacy

noun
     
Related topics: Drugs, Medicines
phar‧ma‧cy plural pharmacies
1 [countable]MD a shop or a part of a shop where medicines are prepared and sold [= chemist]:
an all-night pharmacy
2 [countable] the place where medicines are prepared in a hospital
3 [uncountable]MD the study or practice of preparing drugs and medicines
WORD CHOICE: WORD CHOICE:

pharmacist, pharmacy, chemist, chemist's, drugstore
A pharmacist is someone who prepares and sells medicines. This is the usual word in American English, but in British English pharmacist is slightly technical and it is more usual to use the word chemist.The place where a pharmacist works is a pharmacy. This can be a shop, part of a shop, or part of a hospital. Pharmacy is the usual word in American English. In British English, you usually refer to the part of a hospital that prepares and gives out medicines as a pharmacy , but the usual word for a shop where medicines are prepared and sold is a chemist or a chemist's. In Britain chemists usually also sell other things, such as beauty and baby products. A shop like this in the United States is called a drugstore.See also pharmacist

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