English version

pin

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishpinpin1 /pɪn/ ●●● S3 noun [countable] 🔊 🔊 1 for joining/fasteningDH a) a short thin piece of metal with a sharp point at one end, used especially for fastening together pieces of cloth while making clothes b) a thin piece of metal used to fasten things together, especially broken bones2 jewelleryDCJ American English a piece of metal, sometimes containing jewels, that you fasten to your clothes to wear as a decoration syn brooch British English3 electricalTEE British English one of the pieces of metal that sticks out of an electric plug 🔊 a three-pin plug4 bowling.jpg bowlingDSO one of the bottle-shaped objects that you try to knock down in a game of bowling5 → you could hear a pin drop6 part of bomb a short piece of metal which you pull out of a hand grenade to make it explode a short time later7 golf a metal stick with a flag at the top which marks the holes on a golf course8 → for two pins I’d ...9 → pins → drawing pin, pin money, pins and needles(1), rolling pin, safety pin
Examples from the Corpus
pin• After a skiing accident, Dan had a pin inserted in his wrist.• Then it was belts, circle pins.• The output enable pin of IC5 is controlled by the chip select line of the computer.• Holding a rolling pin and determined to have the last laugh.• Drape half of the dough over the rolling pin, then transfer to the pie pan.• Included in the pack are 20 specially tempered steel pins, 20 plastic caps, and a driving device.• Loose chips will snap into place and you will hear a cracking sound as the pins are pushed deeper into the socket.• But I busted the ball right in the middle of the green, maybe twenty feet past the pin.• Edward Cody, a World Civilization teacher, kept a map of the world with pins marking his students' birthplaces.
pinpin2 ●●○ verb (pinned, pinning) [transitive always + adverb/preposition] 🔊 🔊 1 ATTACHto fasten something somewhere, or to join two things together, using a pinpin something to/on something 🔊 Can you pin this to the notice board? 🔊 He pinned the name tag on his jacket.pin something up 🔊 She had photos of her kids pinned up next to her desk.2 NOT MOVINGto make someone unable to move by putting a lot of pressure or weight on thempin somebody/something to something 🔊 He pinned her arms to her sides.pin somebody against something 🔊 Albert got him pinned against the wall.pin somebody down 🔊 They managed to pin him down until the police arrived.be pinned under/beneath something 🔊 Her body was pinned under the weight of the car. → pin somebody/something ↔ down → pin something on somebody/something→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
pin• He had pinned a red rose to his jacket.• The idea of a crossroads is a difficult concept to pin down because we have to distinguish between different types of changes.• Halcrows say they are stabilising the soil by pinning down the hillsides.• Although we will clarify it in the course of this study, multimedia is hard to pin down to a rigid definition.• She sobbed and fought and screamed but Martin pinned her down with his new strength.• One of the straps was pinned in place with two safety pins.• This year it is pinning its hopes on an 8% uplift in passenger growth to around the 82m mark.• A note was pinned on the door of his office.• Geller is pinning primary hopes on getting the Supreme Court to dismiss the appeal on a procedural point.• You need a lot of time to yourself in order to explore your dreams, rather than being pinned to the work place.• Each delegate wore a name tag pinned to their lapel.be pinned under/beneath something• He held my wrists in one hand as easily as a bunch of flowers and I was pinned beneath his bulk.• It seems to ensure citizens are pinned under its powerful thumb.• It hit the digger and the man who died was pinned under the front wheels.• Despite my life jacket, I was pinned under water by the down-surging river hydraulic.
Related topics: Banking
PINPIN /pɪn/ (also PIN number) noun [countable] 🔊 🔊 BFB (personal identification number) a number that you use when you get money from a machine using a plastic card
Examples from the Corpus
PIN• As a value for money sire he has a PIN index ranking of £54 and a semen cost of £15 a straw.• The chamber doors are available motorised and PIN security protection is provided.• A gang of up to five youths held her prisoner forcing her to reveal her PIN number.• You must destroy the notification of PIN sent to you by us.• One victim is a city housewife who revealed the PIN number of her husband's account.• The PIN for this lock is then given to the person who is authorised to collect the key.• And not only would that help the battle against fraud ... it would end for ever the embarassment of forgetting your PIN number.• Your PIN can be changed as often as you like.
From Longman Business DictionaryPINPIN /pɪn/ noun [countable]BANKING personal identification number; a secret number given to you by your bank that you use when getting money from a cash machine with a card SYN PIN numberWe will notify you of your PIN shortly after the account is opened.Never tell anyone your PIN number.
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Verb table
pin
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theypin
he, she, itpins
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theypinned
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave pinned
he, she, ithas pinned
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad pinned
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill pin
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have pinned
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam pinning
he, she, itis pinning
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you, we, theyare pinning
Past
I, he, she, itwas pinning
you, we, theywere pinning
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been pinning
he, she, ithas been pinning
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been pinning
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be pinning
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been pinning
> View Less