Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Language: Old English
Origin: pinn

pin

1 noun
     
pin1 S3 [countable]
1

for joining/fastening

DH
a) a short thin piece of metal with a sharp point at one end, used especially for fastening together pieces of cloth while making clothes
b) a thin piece of metal used to fasten things together, especially broken bones
2

jewellery

DCJ American English a piece of metal, sometimes containing jewels, that you fasten to your clothes to wear as a decoration [= brooch British English]
3

electrical

TEE British English one of the pieces of metal that sticks out of an electric plug:
a three-pin plug
pin
4

bowling

DSO one of the bottle-shaped objects that you try to knock down in a game of bowling
5

you could hear a pin drop

spoken used to say that it is very quiet and no one is speaking
6

part of bomb

a short piece of metal which you pull out of a hand grenade to make it explode a short time later
7

golf

a metal stick with a flag at the top which marks the holes on a golf course
8

for two pins I'd ...

British English old-fashioned used to say that you would like to do something to someone because they have annoyed you:
For two pins, I'd just send them all home.
9

pins

[plural] British English informal legs

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