English version

plough

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Agriculture, Soil, Tools
ploughplough1 (also plow American English) /plaʊ/ noun [countable] πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 TAa piece of farm equipment used to turn over the earth so that seeds can be planted2 β†’ under the plough β†’ snow plough(1)
Examples from the Corpus
ploughβ€’ I just took a plough over the whole field.β€’ Nos. 44 and 48 passed to London Transport still with bogie mounted plough carriers.β€’ Otherwise a simple plough was used.β€’ The introduction of the plough made possible much greater density of population, concentrated in villages and manors.β€’ Inland, the rich red of the plough fields glowed in the sunshine.β€’ They were more commonly called plough-bullocks from the fact that they pulled the plough in the procession.β€’ Half a million acres came newly under the plough between 1761 and 1792, one million more during the Napoleonic Wars.
Related topics: Agriculture, Soil
ploughplough2 (also plow American English) verb πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 [intransitive, transitive]TADIG to turn over the earth using a plough so that seeds can be planted πŸ”Š In those days the land was plowed by oxen. πŸ”Š a ploughed fieldβ–Ί see thesaurus at dig2 [intransitive always + adverb/preposition]SLOW to move with a lot of effort or forceplough through/up/across etc πŸ”Š We ploughed through the thick mud.3 β†’ plough a lonely/lone furrow β†’ plough ahead β†’ plough something ↔ back β†’ plough into somebody/something β†’ plough on β†’ plough through something β†’ plough something ↔ up
β†’ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
ploughβ€’ Farming practice in recent years has moved to autumn ploughing and early sowing of oil-seed rape and winter wheat.β€’ The land is ploughed and then the seed is sown, the crop sprayed, the harvest taken, and so on.β€’ The fields are ploughed as soon as the winter crop is removed.β€’ Koju was an illiterate villager who had spent his life in the desert ploughing dust with oxen.β€’ It appears their chair had ploughed into the back of another.β€’ And if you have to plough the field anyway, you might as well plant it at the same time.β€’ Now, their lustre faded, they must plough through the qualifying slog to get there.β€’ It was like a huge farm implement ploughing up one pale flower, not quite crushing it.ploughed fieldβ€’ Dumont does not scruple to show the naked corpse, left on the edge of a ploughed field.β€’ It would have been easier to drive across a ploughed field.β€’ Jack went down a rutted, muddy track to a low stone-built wall behind which was a ploughed field.β€’ The bank sloped down about ten feet, into a large ploughed field.β€’ There was no more open country now; we camped always on dark, ploughed fields.β€’ He had first caught sight of her riding in a ploughed field beyond the barbed wire perimeter of the air base.β€’ Innumerable country spires turn bronze amid newly ploughed fields of copper, just for a few moments before the ball disappears.β€’ The ploughed fields were purple and Ambadji, larger now but still riding the horizon, was blue on pale pink.plough through/up/across etcβ€’ Ive been off and I am presently ploughing through 80 odd messages.β€’ Employers may be sifting through dozens of forms and unwilling to plough through a lot of waffle.β€’ Often they are ploughed up from agricultural land, lone victims, their bodies incomplete.β€’ All eager students need do is to plough through its well-presented 600 pages and they will emerge as masters too.β€’ He had just ploughed through seven Seahawks.β€’ Realistically, most staff never will want to plough through the manuals that come with most software.β€’ Now, their lustre faded, they must plough through the qualifying slog to get there.β€’ But instead of ploughing through the text, their introduction to the play comes from Tilt - a new Gloucester-based company.
Plough, thethe PloughPlough, the British English, the Plow American English πŸ”Š πŸ”Š a group of seven bright stars that can only be seen from the northern part of the world. They form part of the constellation (=group of stars) called Ursa Major, and in the US they are often called the Big Dipper.From Longman Business Dictionaryploughplough /plaʊ/ British English, plow American English verb β†’ plough something β†’ back into somethingβ†’ See Verb table
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Verb table
plough (BrE)
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyplough (BrE)
he, she, itploughs (BrE)
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyploughed (BrE)
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave ploughed
he, she, ithas ploughed
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad ploughed
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill plough
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have ploughed
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam ploughing
he, she, itis ploughing
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you, we, theyare ploughing
Past
I, he, she, itwas ploughing
you, we, theywere ploughing
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been ploughing
he, she, ithas been ploughing
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been ploughing
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be ploughing
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been ploughing
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