English version

plug

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishldoce_263_eplugplug1 /plʌɡ/ ●●● S3 noun [countable]  1 electricity a) TEEDa small object at the end of a wire that is used for connecting a piece of electrical equipment to the main supply of electricity The plug on my iron needs changing. an electric plug b) especially British English informalTEED a place on a wall where electrical equipment can be connected to the main electricity supply syn socket, outlet American English2 bathDH a round flat piece of rubber used for stopping the water flowing out of a bath or sink the bath plug3 advertisement informalADVERTISE a way of advertising a book, film etc by mentioning it publicly, especially on television or radioput/get in a plug (for something) During the show she managed to put in a plug for her new book.4 in an engine informalTTC the part of a petrol engine that makes a spark, which makes the petrol start burning syn spark plug Change the plugs every 10,000 miles.5 pull the plug (on something)6 to fill a hole an object or substance that is used to fill or block a hole, tube etcplug of You can fill any holes with plugs of matching wood. earplug7 for holding screwsDHTB British English a small plastic tube put in a hole to hold a screw tightly8 a piece of somethingPIECE a piece of something pressed tightly together a plug of tobacco
Examples from the Corpus
plugEvery morning the chemicals in your anti-perspirant react with your sweat to form a plug.And it comes with a removable air filter, an extra long cable, fitted plug and a two year guarantee.Messages for the intelligent plug are carried by signals on the house wiring.Gee made two more plugs yesterday.Ear defenders: Are supplied in the form of plug or fibre ear inserts or earphone types which fully enclose the ear.The distance between them is like the gap of a spark plug.Busted cord probably, or the plugs went bad.If I ever get that way, just pull the plug.Practically, the banks are not wishing to pull the plug.Where's the plug in here?the plug on the electric blanketHe sleeps with plugs in his ears.bath plugWell, I did have running water; when I pulled the bath plug it ran all over the floor.
plugplug2 ●●● S3 verb (plugged, plugging) [transitive]  1 (also plug up)SHUT/CLOSE to fill or block a small hole We used mud to plug up the holes in the roof.2 ADVERTISEto advertise a book, film etc by mentioning it on television or radio Arnie was on the show to plug his new movie.3 plug the gap4 American English old-fashionedSHOOT to shoot someone plug away plug something ↔ in plug into something→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
plugThe author used the opportunity of appearing on TV to give his latest book a plug.A cyberspace scout sits in a dark room and then plugs a modem directly into his brain.The only reason she agreed to be interviewed was to plug her new record.They plugged him full of lead.A sprinkle more, seeking him; he plugged his ear with his pinky.Whitaker was there to plug his new movie.Its only disadvantage is that it isn't as quite as easy as plugging in a coprocessor card.She had not noticed Amy filling and plugging in an electric kettle, but it was singing efficiently next to the cooker.I plugged my naked feet in between the empty seats as tears rolled down my cheeks.Her head was back and her chin raised, resin plugging the eye sockets.Don't pour oil in the sink - it'll plug up the drain.When one of the cofferdams sprang a huge leak, it was plugged with old mattresses.You then plug your appliance into the adaptor - absolutely no wiring or electrical know-how is needed.
From Longman Business Dictionaryplugplug1 /plʌg/ noun [countable]1informalMARKETING an attempt to persuade people to buy a book, see a film etc by talking about it publicly, especially on television or radioShe appeared on all the talk shows to give her new show a plug.plug forThe authorput in a plug for his new book.2pull the plug (on something) to prevent a plan or business from being able to continue, especially by not providing any more moneyWe were doing fine until the bank pulled the plug on us.plugplug2 verb (plugged, plugging) [transitive] informalMARKETING to try to persuade people to buy a book, see a film etc by talking about it publicly, especially on television or radioHe was on the show to plug his new movie.The insurance company is plugging the advantages of mortgage protection insurance. plug something → in→ See Verb table
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Verb table
plug
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyplug
he, she, itplugs
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyplugged
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave plugged
he, she, ithas plugged
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad plugged
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill plug
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have plugged
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam plugging
he, she, itis plugging
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you, we, theyare plugging
Past
I, he, she, itwas plugging
you, we, theywere plugging
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been plugging
he, she, ithas been plugging
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been plugging
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be plugging
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been plugging
> View Less