Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1200-1300
Language: Old French
Origin: polir, from Latin polire

polish

1 verb
     
polish
pol‧ish1 [transitive]
1 to make something smooth, bright, and shiny by rubbing it:
I spent all afternoon polishing the silver.
polish something with something
Polish the lenses with a piece of tissue.
2 to improve a piece of writing, a speech etc by making slight changes to it before it is completely finished:
Your essay is good, you just need to polish it a bit.
polishing noun [uncountable]

polish somebody/something ↔ off

phrasal verb
a) to finish food, work etc quickly or easily:
Sam polished off the rest of the pizza.
b) American English to kill or defeat a person or animal when they are weak or wounded:
He was polished off with a shotgun blast to the face.

polish something ↔ up

phrasal verb
1 also polish up on something to improve a skill or an ability by practising it:
You should polish up your Spanish before you go to Chile.
2 to make something seem better or more attractive to other people:
The company needs to polish up its image.
3 to polish something
WORD FOCUS: clean WORD FOCUS: clean
wash with soap and water
wipe
with a damp cloth
brush
with a brush to remove the dirt
polish
by rubbing with a cloth
scrub
by rubbing hard
sweep
with a broom
mop
with water and a mop (a tool with a long handle)
vacuum
also hoover British English with a machine that sucks up dust
disinfect
using chemicals to kill germs
cleanse
to clean your skin using a special cream
rinse
to put water on to remove dirt or soap
dust
to remove dust, for example with a cloth


See also
clean

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