English version

pomp

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishpomppomp /pɒmp $ pɑːmp/ noun [uncountable]  formalTRADITION all the impressive clothes, decorations, music etc that are traditional for an important official or public ceremony The Queen’s birthday was celebrated with great pomp and ceremony. all the pomp and circumstance (=an impressive ceremony) of a treaty signing
Examples from the Corpus
pompAll pluck and pomp, it rang throughout the hall in dulcet tones as never before.Prestige, if nothing else, demanded that it be entered into with due pomp and circumstance.The people responsible for pomp and circumstance recognize this.No amount of display or pomp is going to increase it, or lack of it detract.All that space, all that pomp, for just a bit of food.He chafes at the pomp and security that has descended on him with his new post.General Meade cared but little for the pomp and parade of war.pomp and circumstancePrestige, if nothing else, demanded that it be entered into with due pomp and circumstance.The people responsible for pomp and circumstance recognize this.An illustration of this can be found in the funerals of very famous people conducted with great pomp and circumstance.The queen was welcomed with great pomp and circumstance.The Royal Family is all about serious responsibilities: pomp and circumstance, figureheads for the land of hope and glory.The real question is, though, does all this pomp and circumstance result in a superior loaf?
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