English version

predate

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishpredatepre‧date /priːˈdeɪt/ verb [transitive]  BEFOREto happen or exist earlier in history than something else The kingdom predates other African cultures by over 3,000 years.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
predateThe major part of these changes predate 1981.At first, they rolled tires from crucible steel, a method predating Bessemer and the other recent innovations.Stone knives predate bows and arrows.Many economic systems predate capitalism.Corning is a very old technique for preserving meats, predating commercial refrigeration.A strong concern about physical appearance seems to predate the development of anorexia nervosa.The steam engine predates the internal combustion engine by at least 100 years.Rather these are mental health problems which predate the onset of later life.The adhesion function of IgSF members is believed to predate their role in antigen recognition.
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Verb table
predate
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theypredate
he, she, itpredates
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theypredated
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave predated
he, she, ithas predated
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad predated
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill predate
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have predated
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam predating
he, she, itis predating
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you, we, theyare predating
Past
I, he, she, itwas predating
you, we, theywere predating
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been predating
he, she, ithas been predating
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been predating
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be predating
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been predating
> View Less