English version

prejudice

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishprejudiceprej‧u‧dice1 /ˈpredʒədɪs/ ●●○ noun  1 [countable, uncountable]PREJUDICED an unreasonable dislike and distrust of people who are different from you in some way, especially because of their race, sex, religion etc – used to show disapproval Women still face prejudice in the workplace. It takes a long time to overcome these kinds of prejudices.prejudice against a cultural prejudice against fat peopleracial/sexual prejudice Asian pupils complained of racial prejudice at the school.2 [countable, uncountable] strong and unreasonable feelings which make you like some things but not others irrational prejudices Interviewers are often influenced too much by their personal prejudices.3 without prejudice (to something)4 to the prejudice of somethingCOLLOCATIONSadjectivesracial prejudicea novel about a young white boy who is forced to confront his racial prejudiceclass prejudiceThose old class prejudices haven’t gone away.blind prejudice (=prejudice that stops you from considering the facts)I tried to show him he was just talking out of blind prejudice.strong prejudice Women who want to work in broadcasting often encounter strong prejudice.deep-seated prejudice (=very strong and difficult to change)All these attitudes are based on deep-seated prejudice.verbsexperience/encounter prejudiceStudents with learning difficulties often encounter prejudice.overcome prejudicethe story of how a poor kid from the ghetto overcomes poverty and prejudicephrasesprejudice against women/black people etcThere is still a lot of prejudice against women in positions of authority.THESAURUSprejudice an unreasonable dislike and distrust of people who are different from you in some way, especially because of their race, sex, religion etcracial prejudiceprejudice against womendiscrimination the practice of treating one group of people differently from another in an unfair wayThere is widespread discrimination against older people.the laws on sex discriminationintolerance an unreasonable refusal to accept beliefs, customs, and ways of thinking that are different from your ownreligious intoleranceThere is an atmosphere of intolerance in the media.bigotry a completely unreasonable hatred for people of a different race, religion etc, based on strong and fixed opinionsreligious bigotrythe bigotry directed at Jews and other ethnic groups racism/racial prejudice unfair treatment of people because they belong to a different raceMany black people have been the victims of racism in Britain.Some immigrant groups faced racism, for example Jews and Italians, while others, such as Scandinavians, did not.sexism the belief that one sex, especially women, is weaker, less intelligent etc than the other, especially when this results in someone being treated unfairlysexism in languageShe accused him of sexism.ageism (also agism American English) unfair treatment of people because they are oldThe new law aims to stop ageism in the workplace.homophobia prejudice towards or hatred of gay peoplehomophobia in the armed forcesxenophobia /ˌzenəˈfəʊbiə $ -ˈfoʊ-/ hatred and fear of foreignersthe xenophobia of the right-wing pressanti-Semitism a strong feeling of hatred toward Jewish peopleIs anti-Semitism on the increase?Islamophobia hatred and fear of Muslimsthe rise of Islamophobia and right-wing extremism in Europegay/union/America etc bashing unfair public criticism of gay people, union members, the American government etcThe minister was accused of union bashing. There's so much America-bashing in the liberal press.people who are prejudicedracist someone who treats people of other races unfairly or badlyWhen he expressed his opinion, he was branded a racist.bigot someone who has strong unreasonable opinions, especially about race or religiona racist bigotsexist someone, especially a man, who believes that their sex is better, more intelligent, more important etc than the otherWill the sexists ever support a female president?
Examples from the Corpus
prejudiceFor the first time he met, peeping above the surface, the force of a prejudice which had unrelenting ferocity.Is there any person or persons against whom you feel a real or active prejudice?For years he has fought against prejudice and racial hatred.The exercise appears to be little more than an outlet for fear and prejudice.Able young men and women are still held back from success by prejudice.Criticizing people's accents in this way is nothing less than class prejudice.Almost all immigrant groups have faced prejudice in their new countries.She pushed many people away by her critical, biting comments and narrow prejudices.Talk radio, of course, is a nearly continuous wave length of prejudice, directed mostly from the right.There is still a lot of prejudice against gay men.You should learn to identify your own prejudices and deal with them.Antiracists have pointed out that in privileging prejudice and attitudes the multiculturalists have neglected racism as embedded in structures and institutions.The number of hate crimes spurred by racial prejudice is increasing in our state.measures to tackle the problem of racial prejudice in the police forcea rising prejudice against gaysHis son, M.. Vanderk fils, retains the prejudice of the nobility against commerce.Younger people are less susceptible to these prejudices and it is in the field of education that most can be achieved.Being a black man, I have to deal with prejudice every day.racial/sexual prejudiceOne or two other teachers were encouraged by my willingness to argue against racial prejudice and became more vocal themselves.I've seen evidence of his denouncing racial prejudice in others, and it greatly impressed me.And attitude surveys in Britain have been recording a steady decline in racial prejudice.Sometimes overcoming enormous odds, mostly because of racial prejudice, black athletes changed the sporting landscape in the United States.Two more forms of racial prejudice are shown here.Crocker was a child of integration and his lack of racial prejudice in music showed it.These terms are obviously meant to degrade Tom and this also shows racial prejudice although not to such a great extent.
Related topics: Law
prejudiceprejudice2 verb [transitive]  1 PREJUDICEDto influence someone so that they have an unfair or unreasonable opinion about someone or something There was concern that reports in the media would prejudice the jury.prejudice somebody against something My own schooldays prejudiced me against all formal education.2 SCLHARM/BE BAD FORto have a bad effect on the future success or situation of someone or something A criminal record will prejudice your chances of getting a job. He refused to comment, saying he did not wish to prejudice the outcome of the talks.see thesaurus at harm
→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
prejudiceIn view of their greater interest in Jarrad, the plaintiffs contended that they had been unfairly prejudiced.It will not prejudice his claim in any way if he takes all necessary steps to minimise and contain his loss.Indeed failure to take such steps will seriously prejudice his potential claim on the Marine Policy.It also says full repayment would prejudice its economic recovery.Unless the opinion is totally misconceived, an applicant should not be prejudiced merely because it was wrong.The prejudiced parents get exactly what they wanted.The paper shows that there could be a return of these positions without prejudicing the integrity of an Edinburgh and Lothian-wide council.He said Wells's escape would prejudice the juries.A criminal record will prejudice your chances of getting a job.prejudice the outcomeThere is no reason why reduced prices or free stock should not be accepted providing this does not prejudice the outcome.I am still discussing the matter with the company and I do not wish to prejudice the outcome of those talks.
From Longman Business Dictionaryprejudiceprej‧u‧dice1 /ˈpredʒədɪs/ noun [countable, uncountable]1an unreasonable dislike of people because they are different from you in some way, especially because of their race, sex, or religious beliefsprejudice in the workplacethe staff’s awareness of their own prejudices2an unreasonable opinion about something or dislike of itprejudice againstThere’s still a great deal of prejudice against direct marketing.3with/without prejudiceLAW if a legal case is settled with prejudice, it will not be possible to open the case again. If it is settled without prejudice, it will be possible to bring the case to court at a later dateAll pending lawsuits between the two companies will be dismissed with prejudice.The findings were accepted without prejudice.prejudiced adjectiveFar from being prejudiced against women, we have tried hard to advance promising women staff.Prejudiced behavior can be directed against a racial or a national origin group.prejudiceprejudice2 verb [transitive]1to influence someone so they have an unfair opinion about someone or something, and therefore do not treat them equallyShe argued that the publicity will endanger her client’s right to a fair trial by prejudicing future jurors.prejudice somebody against somebody/somethingHer domineering managerial techniques must have prejudiced employees against her still more.2to have a bad effect on the future of someone or somethingA criminal record will prejudice your chances of getting a job.→ See Verb table
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Verb table
prejudice
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyprejudice
he, she, itprejudices
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyprejudiced
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave prejudiced
he, she, ithas prejudiced
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad prejudiced
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill prejudice
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have prejudiced
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam prejudicing
he, she, itis prejudicing
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you, we, theyare prejudicing
Past
I, he, she, itwas prejudicing
you, we, theywere prejudicing
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been prejudicing
he, she, ithas been prejudicing
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been prejudicing
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be prejudicing
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been prejudicing
> View Less