English version

proclivity

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishproclivitypro‧cliv‧i‧ty /prəˈklɪvəti $ proʊ-/ noun (plural proclivities) [countable] 🔊 🔊 formalOFTEN a tendency to behave in a particular way, or to like a particular thing – used especially about something badproclivity to/towards/for 🔊 The child showed no proclivity towards aggression. 🔊 his sexual proclivities
Examples from the Corpus
proclivityNote that certain ancient gender-based proclivities, for better or worse, still often come into play.Quantitative material is also used as evidence for the criminal proclivities of persons with certain social characteristics.When did our nationalist proclivities get traded for brute anticommunism?It is those who had no proclivity towards will making about whom we most wish to know.This proclivity hinders their ability to respond effectively to challenges.proclivity to/towards/forI have always felt a proclivity for Kilburn.The reciprocity is asymmetrical and in consequence it has a proclivity for extending outwards into a network.But old habits die hard, and Apple has shown a proclivity to chase market share while hand-wringing over shrinking gross margins.It is those who had no proclivity towards will making about whom we most wish to know.In some places the proclivity to riot was especially marked.
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