English version

prodigy

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishprodigyprod‧i‧gy /ˈprɒdɪdʒi $ ˈprɑː-/ noun (plural prodigies) [countable] 🔊 🔊 INTELLIGENTa young person who has a great natural ability in a subject or skillgeniuschild/infant prodigy 🔊 Mozart was a musical prodigy.
Examples from the Corpus
prodigyShe was an authentic prodigy, first appearing with an orchestra at age 7.A wonderful, uplifting movie about a child prodigy who is damaged, then saved, by his art.Everest climbers display prodigies of endurance.But on the Latin battlefields he is not a man, but a fearful prodigy.He watched his would-be freshman prodigy Alton Ford make just one of two free throws at the other end.Pete Waterman had once promised his prodigy that one day he would transform her into the Madonna.Werbach was a precocious environmentalist and a leadership prodigy.a tennis prodigychild/infant prodigyA wonderful, uplifting movie about a child prodigy who is damaged, then saved, by his art.As the book opens she is turning this demanding four-year-old into a child prodigy.I was something of a child prodigy.A child prodigy, Balling won a jazz contest in 1944 and formed his own small group.A child prodigy, he was.Evgeny Kissin was the kind of child prodigy who made people believe in the possibility of a Mozart.
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