English version

profuse

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishprofusepro‧fuse /prəˈfjuːs/ adjective  LOT/LARGE NUMBER OR AMOUNTproduced or existing in large quantities He made profuse apologies. Profuse sweating is one of the symptoms of heat exhaustion.profusely adverb The wound was bleeding profusely.profuseness noun [uncountable]
Examples from the Corpus
profuseThe discharge may be quite profuse.The following day, Moira telephoned the Daily Telegraph with profuse apologies for the misunderstanding.Our profuse apologies go out to both gentlemen.I loved its profuse blossoms, its heady scent.Herpes simplex infection, when it involves the cervix, can cause a profuse discharge.The coats of many puppies may be less profuse than that of adults, and so grooming will be more straight forward.profuse apologiesThe following day, Moira telephoned the Daily Telegraph with profuse apologies for the misunderstanding.Our profuse apologies go out to both gentlemen.
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