English version

protest

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishprotestpro‧test1 /ˈprəʊtest $ ˈproʊ-/ ●●○ W3 noun 🔊 🔊 1 PROTEST[countable, uncountable] something that you do to show publicly that you think that something is wrong and unfair, for example taking part in big public meetings, refusing to work, or refusing to buy a company’s productsprotest against 🔊 Students held a protest march against the war. 🔊 Five thousand employees came out on strike in protest at the poor working conditions.2 PROTEST[countable] words or actions that show that you do not want someone to do something or that you dislike something very muchprotest from 🔊 I turned off the TV, despite loud protests from the kids.without protest 🔊 He accepted his punishment without protest. 🔊 She ignored his protests and walked away. 🔊 The programme caused a storm of protest (=a lot of angry protest). 🔊 The announcement was met with howls of protest.3 do something under protestCOLLOCATIONSverbshold/stage/mount a protestOpponents of the plan have staged several protests.lead to/spark (off) protests (=cause them)The arrests sparked off violent street protests.organize a protestShe organized a protest outside the store.protests erupt (=start suddenly)Massive protests erupted across the country.ADJECTIVES/NOUN + protesta public/popular protestThe announcement led to widespread public protests.political protestLee spent five years in prison for his involvement in political protest.a peaceful protestSome 5,000 students and others began a peaceful protest.a violent/angry protestThree people died yesterday in violent protests against the war.a mass protest (=one involving a lot of people)There were mass protests in the capital.a massive protestThey reacted to the king’s forced abdication with massive public protests.a student protestStudent protests were crushed by police.a street protestThere was a ban on street protests.an anti-government protestReligious leaders continued to lead anti-government protests.protest + NOUNa protest group/movementStudents at the heart of the protest movement have called for a general strike. a protest marchThey staged a protest march through the city’s streets.a protest rally (=a large outdoor public meeting to protest about something)A protest rally in the capital was attended by about 400 people.
Examples from the Corpus
protestThe Conference was met by a protest strike in Moscow and the Bolsheviks boycotted the proceedings.Despite angry protests from environmentalists, building will go ahead as planned.At a Senate committee hearing on Wednesday, however, the tire-burning effort drew protests.The ambassador lodged a formal protest against the proposals.Blacks moved in protest, demanding establishment of a police precinct in Harlem.When two members of the team were dismissed, the rest of them walked out in protest.Public employees have threatened mass resignations in protest at the plans.Prisoners have been holding hunger strikes in protest against their living conditions.For the past three years, he taught mathematics at Sonoma State University and led protests against higher student fees.Over fifteen thousand people held a mass protest against racism in the country's capital.Ignoring my protests, he took off his jacket and wrapped it around my shoulders.The school has received over 3,000 letters of protest.The shooting provoked a storm of protest.The key difference in these studies lies in their results for the effects of democratic forms of rule on political protest.Agnes ensconced herself in what had been their bedroom despite my father's protests.The price of one man's protest.Three people died Thursday in violent street protests.The protest begun by Soweto children rapidly spread throughout the country.Despite their protests, the students' fees were increased.in protest atThe rioting began on Sept. 23 when soldiers occupied Kinshasa airport in protest at low pay.On that day thousands marched from West to East Berlin in protest at the terms of unification.On Jan. 13, several people were reported to have been wounded by security forces during demonstrations in protest at the arrests.The four major opposition parties reportedly decided to boycott the Nov. 29 elections in protest at alleged unfair election conditions.Rock bottom: Ex-con strips off in protest at benefit refusal.She shot upright, clutching her head as it throbbed in protest at her sudden move.howls of protestInevitably there would be howls of protest but there are several valid responses to these.This has generated howls of protest from the firms.I got howls of protest from readers who thought that I was deliberately misleading them.That bright idea, understandably, provoked howls of protest and is so obviously wrong that Rep.It's from both of them, repeated verbatim despite the howls of protest raised at the very idea of it all.The announcement was met with howls of protest.This report was met with howls of protest from farmer groups.
protestpro‧test2 /prəˈtest $ ˈprə-/ ●●○ verb 🔊 🔊 1 [intransitive, transitive]PROTEST to come together to publicly express disapproval or opposition to somethingprotest against/at/about 🔊 Thousands of people blocked the street, protesting against the new legislation.protest something American English 🔊 Students protested the decision.2 [intransitive, transitive] to say that you strongly disagree with or are angry about something because you think it is wrong or unfair 🔊 ‘I don’t see why I should take the blame for this!’ she protested.protest that 🔊 Clive protested that he hadn’t been given enough time to do everything.see thesaurus at complain3 [transitive]SAY/STATE to state very firmly that something is true, when other people do not believe youprotest (that) 🔊 Sarah protested that she wasn’t Mick’s girlfriend. 🔊 Years later, he is still protesting his innocence.THESAURUSprotest to do something to show publicly that you disagree with something – used especially when a large group of people do this togetherHuge crowds gathered in the capital protesting against the war.Drivers blocked roads around the capital to protest about the rising cost of fuel. march to walk in a large group from one place to another in order to protest about somethingHundreds of students marched through the city in protest against the employment laws.demonstrate to walk or stand somewhere in a large group, in order to protest about somethingAbout 200 people were demonstrating outside the US Embassy.Environmentalists have been demonstrating against plans to dump waste at sea.riot to protest by behaving in a violent and uncontrolled wayHundreds of workers rioted after pay negotiations broke down.The prisoners were rioting against their appalling conditions.boycott to protest about the actions of a company, country, or industry by refusing to buy something, or refusing to go to a place or eventThey may boycott the next Olympic Games.Shoppers are boycotting battery-farmed eggs.hold/stage a sit-in to protest by refusing to leave a placeThe students have been staging a sit-in to protest about overcrowding at the polytechnic.go on a hunger strike (also go on hunger strike British English) to protest by refusing to eatMaynard went on a hunger strike to protest his innocence.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
protest"I don't think that's fair!" she protested.When the army took power, huge crowds gathered in the capital to protest.There was nothing they could do, she protested.Prisoners had climbed onto the roof to protest about conditions in the jail.Passengers protested angrily about increased rail fares.Rather than protest anymore, he took his punishment silently and disappeared into his room.The shipowner had protested his innocence, claiming that the loss of his ship was genuine.Apart from protesting his innocence, Hebden had said nothing of importance since the drive down to London.Throughout the trial Reilly protested his innocence.Mills, who has been in prison since 1987, has always protested his innocence.Jubilant, most gave up the idea of protesting in the freezing temperatures again, but approximately 1,000 persisted with their plan.Dan protested it wasn't him who had caused the problems.He was carried away in a police van, protesting loudly.People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals is protesting one of the joyous traditions of hockey, says the newsletter Dispatches.Marge protested that she had never had any kind of affair with Lawrence.a huge crowd of students protesting the globalization of tradeThe journalists have protested to government officials about the way they were treated.He may protest to the auditor that this is a waste of time.This was not a joke, Aunt Paulie would protest when the laughter began.protest somethingStudents protested the change.protest thatHe was tried and executed, protesting that he had nothing to do with the affair.In vain did he protest that he was here on holiday and nothing else.And people were protesting that it blocked the view.Bisset protested that it was wrong to accuse Burke of inconsistency, because of the change of his arguments.Opposition came mainly from lawyers and magistrates, protesting that prosecutions would increase the number of offences on account of the publicity.Everyone laughed as Ashley protested that she wasn't Tom's girlfriend.The lawyer protested that there was no evidence for such charges.Even though they may protest that they are perfectly capable of driving, they won't be.protesting ... innocenceBut within this controversy lay another, which left two proud men protesting their innocence.Ramzan has telephoned newspapers in Bradford and Blackburn protesting his innocence.The grey pylons backed her up, pulling out their empty pockets - protesting innocence.Apart from protesting his innocence, Hebden had said nothing of importance since the drive down to London.At Christmas William Marshal, loudly protesting his innocence, left his master's service and rode off in search of fresh tournaments.Evans was found guilty and hanged for murder in July 1949, protesting his innocence to the last.She had been granted absolution of her sins, but had died protesting her innocence to the last.Furthermore, protesting one's innocence will be seen as the kind of thing that everyone who is convicted does.
From Longman Business Dictionaryprotestpro‧test1 /ˈprəʊtestˈproʊ-/ noun1[countable, uncountable] an angry complaint that shows you disagree with something, or when you state publicly that you think something is wrong or unfairThe union is making a formal protest to the government about the matter.protest against/atMiners staged a two-hour strike in protest against the effects of the economic reforms.Health workers marched on Nov. 17 in protest at government restrictions on health service expenditure.2[countable] an occasion when people meet together in public to express disapproval or opposition to something17,000 demonstrators took part in a student protest against education loans.Later this month, protest marches are planned by farmers’ groups.protester noun [countable]More than 2,000 protesters demonstrated outside Parliament today.3under protest unwillingly, and with the feeling that you have been unfairly treatedI only signed the document under protest.The tax demand was disputed by the company, and the payments were made under protest.protestpro‧test2 /prəˈtest/ verb1[intransitive] British English to show publicly that you disagree with something you think is wrong or unfairprotest against/at/aboutPeople always protest against new forms of taxation.2[intransitive, transitive] American English to say or do something publicly to show that you disagree with something you think is wrong or unfairprotest somethingAbout 40,000 angry Connecticut residents gathered outside the Capitol in Hartford to protest a new income tax.3[transitive] to state very firmly that something is true, especially when other people do not believe youprotest thatThe AFL-CIO’s Richard Sawyer protested that thousands of local jobs may be lost to Mexico if the trade agreement is approved.→ See Verb table
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.
Verb table
protest
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyprotest
he, she, itprotests
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyprotested
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave protested
he, she, ithas protested
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad protested
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill protest
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have protested
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam protesting
he, she, itis protesting
> View More
you, we, theyare protesting
Past
I, he, she, itwas protesting
you, we, theywere protesting
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been protesting
he, she, ithas been protesting
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been protesting
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be protesting
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been protesting
> View Less