English version

proviso

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishprovisopro‧vi‧so /prəˈvaɪzəʊ $ -zoʊ/ noun (plural provisos) [countable] formal  CONDITION/something THAT MUST BE DONEa condition that you ask for before you will agree to somethingwith the proviso that The money was given to the museum with the proviso that it should be spent on operating costs.
Examples from the Corpus
provisoJust one proviso and it is one that everyone in our industry knows ... this business is no soft option.He agreed to do the work, but there was one proviso - he wanted to be paid in cash.Bill had left the money to his grandson, with the proviso that it should be spent on his education.The proviso about having to buy to keep is perfectly reasonable.The proviso states that the Covenant does not require any legislation or other action prohibited by the Constitution.Social custom made this proviso almost nugatory.Surely our descendants are entitled to say, with proviso, ` I call this place my home.with the proviso thatGrace agreed, with the proviso that she and Herbert should make their break permanent.This is of course with the proviso that these measures can be calculated accurately.Other companies are happy to invest, with the proviso that the government does not neglect its duty.The money was given to the museum with the proviso that it be spent on operating costs.Hall agreed to this, with the proviso that Clarke should not have the exclusive right of sale at the exhibition.
From Longman Business Dictionaryprovisopro‧vi‧so /prəˈvaɪzəʊ-zoʊ/ noun [countable]1LAW a part of a contract that covers a particular subjectLandlords frequently include a proviso stating that nothing contained in the lease shall prevent them from carrying out work on their property.2formal something that must happen before you will agree to somethingproviso thatThe only proviso is that you should let the office manager know well in advance if you decide to take a day off.Some companies are happy to invest in community projects, with the proviso that the government does not neglect its own duty.
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.