English version

put somebody/something on

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishput somebody/something on phrasal verb1 clothes put something ↔ onDCCPUT ON CLOTHES to put a piece of clothing on your body opp take off πŸ”Š He took off his uniform and put on a sweater and trousers. πŸ”Š I’ll have to put my glasses on; I can’t read the sign from here.2 on skin put something ↔ onDCBPUT to put make-up, cream etc on your skin πŸ”Š I’ve got to put this cream on twice a day.3 affect/influence something put something on something to do something that affects or influences someone or something else πŸ”Š The government put a limit on imports of textiles. πŸ”Š Pat was putting pressure on him to leave his wife.4 start equipment put something ↔ onSWITCH ON OR OFF to make a light or a piece of equipment start working by pressing or turning a button or switch syn switch on, turn on πŸ”Š He got up and put on the light. πŸ”Š Shall I put the kettle on?5 music put something ↔ onAPM to put a record, tape, or CD into a machine and start playing it πŸ”Š She put on some music while they ate.6 pretend put something ↔ onPRETEND to pretend to have a particular feeling, opinion, way of speaking etc especially in order to get attention πŸ”Š Sheila’s not really that upset; she’s just putting it on. πŸ”Š Leaving the court, the families all tried to put on a brave face (=not show that they were sad or worried).7 put on weight/12 lbs/4 kg etcHBHFAT to become fatter and heavier syn gain πŸ”Š Rosie’s put on five kilos since she quit smoking.8 event/concert/play etc put something ↔ onPERFORM to arrange for a concert, play etc to take place, or to perform in it πŸ”Š One summer the children put on a play.9 show what you can do put something ↔ on to show what you are able to do or what power you have πŸ”Š The team need to put on another world-class performance.10 cook put something ↔ onDFC to start cooking something πŸ”Š Shall I put the pasta on now?11 provide something put something ↔ on British EnglishTT to provide a service for people, especially a special one πŸ”Š BA is putting on extra flights to cover the Christmas rush.12 you’re putting me on! American English spokenJOKE used to tell someone that you think they are joking πŸ”Š He wouldn’t do that – you’re putting me on.13 risk money put something on somethingDGG to risk an amount of money on the result of a game, race etc syn bet πŸ”Š We put Β£50 on Brazil to win the Cup.14 add put something on somethingADD to add an amount of money or tax onto the cost of something πŸ”Š Can smokers really complain if more tax is put on cigarettes?15 telephone put somebody ↔ on to give someone the telephone so that they can talk to someone who is telephoning πŸ”Š Can you put Janet on? β†’ putβ†’ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
putting pressure onβ€’ These forces are putting pressure on academic medical centers such as Columbia and its College of Physicians and Surgeons.β€’ If this were so, and the photographer was putting pressure on him, then Steen's reactions were consistent.β€’ We were always putting pressure on him to jack it in.β€’ Her theory is that a proliferation of culinary gadgets is putting pressure on kitchen storage space.β€’ Now tort reform advocates think they can move bills out of the Assembly and to the Senate, putting pressure on Lockyer.β€’ They hold hands gingerly to avoid putting pressure on the boils in their armpits.β€’ The Liverpool lecturers are calling on vice chancellor Peter Toyne to join them in putting pressure on the government to end underfunding.β€’ It uses the media to try to embarrass companies into putting pressure on their subsidiaries.put on a brave faceβ€’ He was shattered, though he put on a brave face.β€’ I suppose parents have to put on a brave face.β€’ Leaving the court the families all tried to put on a brave face.β€’ Newspaper staff put on a brave face.β€’ No one said a word all of us were consciously putting on a brave face.β€’ Whether in denial or putting on a brave face, the delegates professed to be unperturbed by those numbers.β€’ Meanwhile, Llandundo put on a brave face yesterday and struggled to get back to normal after last week's devastating floods.you’re putting me on!β€’ Seth is moving to Alaska? You're putting me on!
put-onˈput-on noun [countable usually singular] πŸ”Š πŸ”Š American English informalTRICK/DECEIVE something you say or do to try to make someone believe something that is not true
Examples from the Corpus
put-onβ€’ At first they were thinking it was a big put-on.
From Longman Business Dictionaryput something on something phrasal verb [transitive]1to add an amount of money onto the price or cost of somethingThe new tax could put another ten cents on the price of gas.At the close of trading, Sears put on 2 to 92p.Turnover put on almost £70 million to £337.5 million.2to risk an amount of money on the result of a game, race etcWe put £50 on Brazil to win the Cup. → put→ See Verb table
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Verb table
put
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyput
he, she, itputs
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyput
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave put
he, she, ithas put
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad put
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill put
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have put
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam putting
he, she, itis putting
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you, we, theyare putting
Past
I, he, she, itwas putting
you, we, theywere putting
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been putting
he, she, ithas been putting
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been putting
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be putting
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been putting
> View Less