English version

quantify

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Measurement
quantifyquan‧ti‧fy /ˈkwɒntɪfaɪ $ ˈkwɑːn-/ ●○○ verb (quantified, quantifying, quantifies) [transitive] 🔊 🔊 TMDESCRIBEto calculate the value of something and express it as a number or an amount 🔊 an attempt to quantify the region’s social and economic declinedifficult/impossible to quantify 🔊 The damage caused to the tourist industry is difficult to quantify.quantifiable adjective 🔊 The cost of unemployment to the government is quite easily quantifiable.
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Examples from the Corpus
quantifyIn the UK, the operation will not be performed until the risks are better understood and quantified.But can the numbers and purchasing power of those following the Yuppy life-style be quantified?Even so, Sir Matthew admitted that the wider implications of the weak housing market on the industry were hard to quantify.The incidence of elder abuse is hard to quantify.It's difficult to quantify how long it will take to finish the project.Similarly, insects and land snail shells are identified, sorted and quantified in the same way as animal and plant remains.This, the Riemann curvature tensor, quantifies space-time curvature.The research should help quantify the differences between older and younger drivers.Like study of the forest, it may take a generation to quantify the effect on fish stock.Their objective was to develop a model which quantified the permeability of rock as drilling proceeded.It is impossible to quantify what an active cultural life does for a city.Just quantifying your financial goals will make you feel more in control of your future.difficult/impossible to quantifyBecause there are so many desirable objectives to achieve for the convalescent patient the outcome of rehabilitative measures is difficult to quantify.How much impact they will actually have is impossible to quantify.In sheep, the extent to which cloning produces over-large fetuses is difficult to quantify.More fundamentally, this preoccupation with numerical aspects may draw attention away from important issues that are more difficult to quantify.These are more difficult to quantify.The benefits are difficult to quantify but qualitatively they would mean faster and more predictable service for lexicographers.The demands on the human operator are difficult to quantify or even to describe because the process is essentially an interactive one.
From Longman Business Dictionaryquantifyquan‧ti‧fy /ˈkwɒntəfaɪˈkwɑːn-/ verb (past tense and past participle quantified) [transitive] to measure something and express it as a number, especially something that is difficult to measureQuantifying the effect of advertising on sales is difficult.quantifiable adjectiveCan the project offer a quantifiable payback?quantification noun [uncountable]the quantification of future loss→ See Verb table
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Verb table
quantify
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyquantify
he, she, itquantifies
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyquantified
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave quantified
he, she, ithas quantified
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad quantified
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill quantify
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have quantified
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam quantifying
he, she, itis quantifying
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you, we, theyare quantifying
Past
I, he, she, itwas quantifying
you, we, theywere quantifying
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been quantifying
he, she, ithas been quantifying
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been quantifying
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be quantifying
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been quantifying
> View Less