English version

realization

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishrealizationre‧a‧li‧za‧tion (also realisation British English) /ˌrɪəlaɪˈzeɪʃən $ -lə-/ ●○○ noun [singular, uncountable]  1 UNDERSTANDwhen you understand something that you had not understood beforerealization of I was shocked by the realization of what I had done.realization that the realization that she might never recover from her illness There is a growing realization that we must manage the Earth’s resources more carefully.2 SUCCESSFUL formal when you achieve something that you had planned or hoped for syn achievementrealization of the realization of his dreams3 BBT technicalMONEY when you change something into money by selling it the realization of assets
Examples from the Corpus
realizationWhat Simmel accomplishes is a realization of the inseparability of the positive and negative consequences of these social transformations.That is the same life-changing realization that Shamsiddeen and other hajji say they found in Mecca.Classical elite theorists had sought to show that liberal democracy was a utopian ideal incapable of realization.When you have parity of power, that promotes understanding and the realization that all employees are interdependent.But they can also be seen as communicatively motivated, the realization of available resources to get a message across.Nothing is more exhilarating than the realization that you can make money by doing work that you love.Large-scale expectations may depend for their realization on changes in society and its value patterns.It was fabulous, gorgeous in its excess, the ultimate realization of some untrammeled private fantasy.realization ofGetting this role in a major film was a realization of her childhood dreams.
From Longman Business Dictionaryrealizationrea‧li‧za‧tion /ˌrɪəlaɪˈzeɪʃən-lə-/ (also realisation British English) noun [singular, uncountable]FINANCE the act of changing something into money by selling itThe sale will result in the realization of over £325 million.