Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1200-1300
Language: Old French
Origin: raison, from Latin ratio; RATIO

reason

1 noun
     
rea‧son1 S1 W1
1

cause

[countable] why someone decides to do something, or the cause or explanation for something that happensCOLLOCATIONS COLLOCATIONS
reason (that) reason why reason for (doing) something reason to do something a good reason a compelling reason (=a reason that persuades you) give a reason (for something) for some reason (or other/or another) (=for a reason that you do not know) for personal reasons for sentimental reasons (=because of your feelings, not for practical reasons) for the simple reason (that) for obvious reasons for reasons of something for reasons best known to himself/themselves etc (=used when someone does something surprising) no/any reason whatsoever have your reasons (=have a secret reason for doing something) see no reason why/to do something by reason of something formal (=because of something)
The reason I called was to ask about the plans for Saturday.
We'd like to know the reason why she didn't accept the job.
People give different reasons for wanting to change jobs.
They must have had a good reason to do it.
reason behind
He explained the reasons behind the decision.
He wouldn't give the reasons for his decision.
For some reason or other, he couldn't come today.
She wants to change her job for purely personal reasons.
I kept the photos for sentimental reasons.
She didn't answer for the simple reason that she couldn't think of anything to say.
For obvious reasons, we've changed the names.
The tower is closed for reasons of safety.
For reasons best known to herself, she's sold the house and left the country.
There's no reason whatsoever to doubt her story.
'Why did you tell him?' 'Oh, I had my reasons.'
I see no reason why it shouldn't work.
see usage note cause1
2

good or fair

[uncountable] a fact that makes it right or fair for someone to do something
(no) reason to do something
There is no reason to panic.
She has reason to feel guilty.
We have reason to believe that the goods were stolen.
I know I'm late, but that's no reason to shout at me.
Under the circumstances, we had every reason (=had very good reasons) to be suspicious.
with (good) reason (=based on something sensible)
Natalie was alarmed by the news, and with reason.
3

all the more reason why/to do something

spoken used to say that what has just been mentioned is an additional reason for doing what you have suggested:
But surely that's all the more reason to act quickly.
4

good judgment

[uncountable] sensible judgment and understanding [= sense]:
There's reason in what he says.
They're not prepared to listen to reason (=be persuaded by someone's sensible advice).
There's no way of making my father see reason (=accept advice and make a sensible decision).
5

within reason

within sensible limits:
You can go anywhere you want, within reason.
6

go/be beyond (all) reason

to be more than is acceptable or reasonable:
Their demands go beyond all reason.
7

ability to think

[uncountable] the ability to think, understand, and form judgments that are based on facts:
lose your reason old-fashioned (=become mentally ill)
8

no reason

spoken used when someone asks you why you are doing something and you do not want to tell them:
'Why d'you want to go that way?' 'Oh, no reason.'

➔ no rhyme or reason

at rhyme1 (4)

➔ it stands to reason

at stand1 (32)
GRAMMAR GRAMMAR

!! Reason is never followed by of or because. You can talk about the reason for something, the reason that something happens , or the reason why something happens Can you explain the reasons for (NOT reasons of) your decision? The main reason why/that (NOT reason because) I'm writing is to invite you to stay. You can also leave out why or that I like children, and that's the reason I became a teacher.!! Reason is not usually followed by against. When you are giving reasons why something is bad, use argument against An important argument against (NOT reason against) capital punishment is the possibility of error.
WORD CHOICE: WORD CHOICE:

cause, reason
A cause is something such as an action, event, or situation that makes something happen The cause of the accident is not known. a determination to tackle the causes of crimeA reason is an explanation for something Can you think of any reason why he would behave in this way? There is a good reason (NOT a good cause) for my decision. GRAMMARUse the cause of, not 'cause for' or 'cause why' What is the cause of all this unrest?!!cause for is used in some expressions such as cause for alarm/concern/complaint/optimism/satisfaction There is no cause for concern. His remarks give some cause for hope.Use cause somebody to do something, not 'cause that somebody does something' A cat ran into the road, causing her to brake suddenly (NOT causing that she braked suddenly).See also cause

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