Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1300-1400
Language: Old North French
Origin: receivre, from Latin recipere, from capere 'to take'

receive

verb
     
re‧ceive S1 W1 [transitive]
1

be given something

to be given something [= get]:
All the children will receive a small gift.
receive something from somebody
She received an honorary degree from Harvard.
receive attention/affection/support
She received no support from her parents.
receive payment/money/a pension etc
They will be entitled to receive unemployment benefit.
receive a prize/award/gift etc
He went up to receive his award from the mayor.
receive education/training
16- to 18-year-olds receiving full-time education
Lee received 324 votes (=324 people voted for him).
! In spoken English it is more usual to use get.
2

be sent something

formal to get a letter, message, or telephone call, or something which someone has sent you
receive something from somebody
He received a letter from his insurance company.
If you would like to receive further information, return the attached form.
We have received numerous complaints about the noise.
3

treatment

formalMIMH if you receive a particular type of medical treatment, it is done to you:
He received hospital treatment for a cut over his eye.
4

reaction to something

[usually passive] to react in a particular way to a suggestion, idea, performance etc [↪ reception]:
The film was well received by critics (=they said it was good).
He received the news in silence.
5

be on/at the receiving end (of something)

to be the person who is affected by someone else's actions, usually in an unpleasant way:
She found herself on the receiving end of racist abuse.
6

receive an injury/blow

formal to be injured or hit
7

people

formalSS to officially accept someone as a guest or member of a group
receive guests/visitors
She isn't well enough to receive visitors yet.
receive somebody into something
She was later received into the Church.
8

by radio

a) TCB if a radio or television receives radio waves or other signals, it makes them become sounds or pictures
b) TCB to be able to hear a radio message that someone is sending:
Receiving you loud and clear!'

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