English version

receptive

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishreceptivere‧cep‧tive /rɪˈseptɪv/ adjective  WILLINGwilling to consider new ideas or listen to someone else’s opinions You might find them in a more receptive mood tomorrow. a receptive audiencereceptive to a workforce that is receptive to new ideasreceptiveness (also receptivity /ˌriːsepˈtɪvəti/) noun [uncountable]
Examples from the Corpus
receptiveBeing receptive and responding rapidly even to minor complaints is an indicator that the school cares.a receptive audienceAnd what a pleasure to speak to such receptive minds!It is usually reserved for the grand finale, after the singing and preaching have induced a receptive mood.The crucial question here is what makes individuals receptive or resistant to racist ideas.If he implements it and things go well, he will be more receptive to employee input in the future.If anything, they seemed rather receptive to the idea of talking about invasion of the locality by monsters from deep space.Few other places on earth would be so receptive to the use of performance measures.receptive moodIt is usually reserved for the grand finale, after the singing and preaching have induced a receptive mood.The words and melodies of the hymns used during the day all helped to put me in a receptive mood.
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