English version

reckon

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishreckonreck‧on /ˈrekən/ ●●○ S3 verb [transitive] 🔊 🔊 1 spokenTHINK/HAVE THE OPINION THAT to think or suppose somethingreckon (that) 🔊 Do you reckon he’ll agree to see us? 🔊 The police reckon that whoever killed Dad was with him earlier that day. 🔊 ‘There’s nothing we can do about it.’ ‘You reckon (=used to express doubt or disagreement)?’2 GUESSto guess a number or amount, without calculating it exactlyreckon (that) 🔊 We reckon that sitting in traffic jams costs us around $9 billion a year in lost output.reckon something to be something 🔊 The average selling price for flats in the area was reckoned to be around £200,000.3 JUDGEto think that someone or something is a particular kind of person or thingbe reckoned to be something 🔊 The Lowsons were reckoned to be very good farmers. 🔊 Moving house is reckoned to be nearly as stressful as divorce.be reckoned as something 🔊 An earthquake of magnitude 7 is reckoned as a major quake. Grammar Reckon is usually passive in this meaning.4 formalCOUNT/CALCULATE to calculate an amount 🔊 The expression ‘full moon’ means the fourteenth day of the moon reckoned from its first appearance.GRAMMAR: Using the progressiveReckon is not used in the progressive. You say: I reckon he’s going to win. Don’t say: I’m reckoning he’s going to win. reckon on something reckon something ↔ up reckon with somebody/something reckon without somebody/something→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
reckonThe TV audience in China is reckoned at 800 million.Brenda reckons having her own bike has a few benefits.I reckon I'd do it for a thousand pounds.How long do you reckon it will take?None of us had reckoned on open-heart surgery.If it's being run for the short-term, they reckon, that could account for a lot of its recent pragmatism.Sun insiders reckon the company will price-list Motif almost immediately.They reckon the French team's better than ours.This hotel is reckoned to be one of the best in the country.By now he was a quick and decisive player, a force to be reckoned with at center half.What do you reckon - would this make a good present for Donald's birthday?reckon (that)Scientists reckon a third of global-warming gases are produced by cars and trucks.I had eaten a few curries in my time, I reckoned, but never in such natural and ethnic conditions.Not a day over twenty-five, Charlotte reckoned - hardly two years senior to herself.Peter Alliss reckoned it was probably the end for Ballesteros if he hadn't come roaring back by 1992.In brief Constable reckons it will have the first UK-published book on the Waco disaster.We reckon she was brought in from somewhere nearby, and dumped on us.Gurney reckons this design makes the bike more stable because the centre of gravity is lower.Andersen reckons this is because companies are using desktop systems more and more.Twenty years, he reckoned, to an Assistant Director's desk in Headquarters.reckon (that)I had eaten a few curries in my time, I reckoned, but never in such natural and ethnic conditions.Not a day over twenty-five, Charlotte reckoned - hardly two years senior to herself.Peter Alliss reckoned it was probably the end for Ballesteros if he hadn't come roaring back by 1992.In brief Constable reckons it will have the first UK-published book on the Waco disaster.We reckon she was brought in from somewhere nearby, and dumped on us.Gurney reckons this design makes the bike more stable because the centre of gravity is lower.Andersen reckons this is because companies are using desktop systems more and more.Twenty years, he reckoned, to an Assistant Director's desk in Headquarters.be reckoned to be somethingAn ounce of coral beads was reckoned to be worth ten large jars of oil.In March 1403 his numerous benefices were reckoned to be worth over £800 a year.Not so in the Soviet Union, where some 60,000 are reckoned to be installed.Nymansay is reckoned to be the hardiest, and was first grown in the gardens of Nymans in West Sussex.The Mercier portrait is reckoned to be the earliest, and in many respects the most interesting likeness of Handel in London.The true pace of recovery in alcoholism is reckoned to be one month for every year of use.This clump is reckoned to be 2,000 years old.
From Longman Business Dictionaryreckonreck‧on /ˈrekən/ verb [transitive]1to guess a number or amount that you know something about but have not calculated exactlyreckon something to be somethingThe deal is reckoned to be worth over $1.3 billion.2formal to calculate an amountThe time in which the proceedings for the recovery of money may take place is reckoned from the date of the demand.→ See Verb table
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.
Verb table
reckon
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyreckon
he, she, itreckons
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyreckoned
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave reckoned
he, she, ithas reckoned
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad reckoned
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill reckon
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have reckoned
> View Less