English version

recurrent

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishrecurrentre‧cur‧rent /rɪˈkʌrənt $ -ˈkɜːr-/ adjective 🔊 🔊 AGAINhappening or appearing several times 🔊 recurrent minor illnesses 🔊 Political revolution is a recurrent theme in Riley’s books.recurrently adverb
Examples from the Corpus
recurrentOthers are killed by recurrent cold waves, by boat propellers, and infrequently by crocodiles and sharks.She had a history of recurrent eczema but no exposure to toxic products.Both local and national industrial action by prison officers has been a recurrent event.a recurrent infectionFeedback networks that have closed loops are recurrent systems.Leaning rather than pulling is a recurrent theme in windsurfing which, once mastered, leads to rapid progress.Its effect was particularly damaging in relation to the recurrent tragedies of death in childhood, which are examined in the next chapter.Often there is a family history of recurrent ulcers in the parents as well.recurrent themeA persistent, recurrent theme; a single strand of ancient lore in the weave.Yet, despite the stylistic variety, there is a noticeable abundance of recurrent themes and messages.But suicide is a recurrent theme in support group discussions.We examine these recurrent themes in the managers' first-year biographies in the following pages.The waking and stirring of life is a recurrent theme in this poem.Leaning rather than pulling is a recurrent theme in windsurfing which, once mastered, leads to rapid progress.A quite different sort of example is the recurrent theme of asking for a sign in the gospel narratives.A repeated stress upon the benefits brought by diversity is a recurrent theme of the Council documents.
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