English version

rent

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Finance, Trade
rentrent1 /rent/ ●●● S2 W3 verb πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 [intransitive, transitive]BORROW to regularly pay money to live in a house or room that belongs to someone else, or to use something that belongs to someone else πŸ”Š Most students rent rooms in their second year. πŸ”Š I’d rather have my own house than rent.rent something from somebody πŸ”Š Some farmers rent their land from the council.2 (also rent out) [transitive]BFLEND to let someone live in a house, room etc that you own, or use your land, in return for money syn let British Englishrent something (out) to somebody πŸ”Š She rents out two rooms to students.3 [transitive] especially American EnglishBBTBORROW to pay money for the use of something for a short period of time syn hire British English πŸ”Š Will you rent a car while you’re in Spain?THESAURUSto pay money to use somethingrent to pay money to use a house, room, vehicle, piece of equipment, area of land etcHe rented a room in a house on the Old Kent Road.They flew out to New York and rented a car at the airport.hire British English to pay money to use a car or a piece of clothing or equipment for a short period of timeWhy don't we hire a van for the day?You can hire suits for weddings.lease to have a legal agreement under which you pay money to a person or company in order to use a building, area of land, vehicle, piece of equipment etc for a fixed period of time They leased the offices from an American company.The car is leased from BMW.to allow somebody to use something for moneyrent/rent something out to allow someone to use a house, room, vehicle, piece of equipment, area of land etc in return for moneyShe rents the flat out to students.let/let something out to allow someone to use a room, house, building etc in return for moneySome people don't want to let rooms to foreigners.They let the house out while they were on holiday.lease/lease something out to make a legal agreement which allows a person or company to use something that you own for a fixed period of timeSanta Clara ' s Redevelopment Agency leased the existing city golf course to developers. β†’ rent at/for something
β†’ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
rentβ€’ Do you own your home or are you renting?β€’ He finally decided to rent a condo on the lake.β€’ We rented a couple of movies this weekend.β€’ Did you know you can rent a fax machine from the telephone company?β€’ When she got to Dallas she rented a Ford convertible from the Avis desk.β€’ He rented a further acre of land and erected five kilns, a drying floor and engine house.β€’ Vicky put the house up for rent a month ago, but changed her mind the next day.β€’ You rented a tuxedo for two hundred dollars? Are you crazy?β€’ Should we rent a video tonight?β€’ Later, they rented an apartment to other refugees in a building they own.β€’ Many young couples rent an apartment until they've saved enough money to buy a house.β€’ I can't afford to rent an office in this part of town.β€’ Imagine tossing the keys to a 300-horsepower rented Corvette to a seventeen-year-old boy who likes race cars.β€’ Instead, many fell upon him and rent him.β€’ Of the 4,190,000 households entitled to rent rebates only 2,930,000 received them.β€’ Beck and his wife are renting while they look for a house to buy.rent something (out) to somebodyβ€’ The rent still had to be paid and it was impossible to sell the lease with so much property available.β€’ But the rent also had to be paid.β€’ You see, the parish owns some property which is rented very cheaply to deserving people.β€’ The second man was Jimmy Biondo, who owned the place but no longer used it, and rented it to Jack.β€’ Now he makes ends meet by renting rooms to students.β€’ Slimmed workforces and dropping city office rents have seen to that.β€’ It also provided an Β£80,000 rent guarantee to the landlord.β€’ Later she got a second loan, which she used to buy a rickshaw which she rents out to the villagers.
Related topics: Business, Trade
rentrent2 ●●● S2 W3 noun πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 [countable, uncountable]BCOST the money that someone pays regularly to use a room, house etc that belongs to someone else πŸ”Š I pay the rent at the beginning of every month.rent of πŸ”Š an annual rent of Β£8,000β–Ί see thesaurus at cost2 [countable, uncountable] especially American EnglishBBTCOST an amount of money that you pay to use a car, boat etc that belongs to someone else πŸ”Š The rent was only $20 an hour.3 β†’ for rent4 [countable]HOLE formal a large tear in something made of cloth πŸ”Š huge rents in the curtainsCOLLOCATIONSADJECTIVES/NOUN + renthighRents in the city centre are very high.lowOur workers get low rents and other advantages.exorbitant (=extremely high)Some landlords charge exorbitant rents.fixedThe rent is fixed for three years.affordable (=which people can easily pay)The government plans to provide more homes at affordable rents.the annual/monthly/weekly rentOur annual rent is just over $15000.ground rent British English (=rent paid to the owner of the land that a house, office etc is built on)There is an additional ground rent of Β£30 per month.a peppercorn rent British English (=an extremely low rent)The colonel let us have the cottage for a peppercorn rent.back rent (=rent you owe for an earlier period)Mrs Carr said she is still owed several thousand dollars in back rent.the rent is due (=it must be paid at a particular time)The rent is due at the beginning of the week.verbspay the rentShe couldn’t afford to pay the rent.increase/raise the rent (also put up the rent British English)The landlord wants to put up the rent.fall behind with the rent/get behind on the rent (=fail to pay your rent on time)You could be evicted if you fall behind with the rent.collect the rentHis job is to collect the rents from the tenants.the rent increases/goes upThe rent has gone up by over 50% in the last two years.rent + NOUNa rent increaseHow can they justify such big rent increases?rent arrears British English (=money that you owe because you have not paid your rent)The most common debts were rent arrears.a rent book British English (=a book that shows the payments you have made in rent)
Examples from the Corpus
rentβ€’ His regular commitments - rent, electricity, etc. - are Β£38.08 and 50p insurance.β€’ It also established the first Crofters Commission as a permanent body empowered to fix fair rents and administer crofting legislation.β€’ She pays Β£350 a month rent for a one-bedroomed apartment.β€’ Office rents are highest in the city centre.β€’ Meyer said the shortage of apartments and continued pressure on rents would continue for the next three years.β€’ When they could pay rent, they did.β€’ The group will also recommend improved access to private rented accommodation through rent deposit schemes.β€’ Many S corporation owners are rich people on paper but can barely pay the rent.β€’ If my landlord raises the rent again, I'll have to look for somewhere smaller.β€’ The rent is $850 a month.β€’ At a staggering Β£385 a week rent.β€’ One resident was evicted after she withheld rent.
rentrent3 πŸ”Š πŸ”Š x-refthe past tense and past participle of rend
Examples from the Corpus
rentβ€’ I had to rent a driveway across the street.β€’ He rented a further acre of land and erected five kilns, a drying floor and engine house.β€’ Later, they rented an apartment to other refugees in a building they own.β€’ Imagine tossing the keys to a 300-horsepower rented Corvette to a seventeen-year-old boy who likes race cars.β€’ Instead, many fell upon him and rent him.β€’ Every available hotel room was rented out and, on some weekends, county gasoline pumps ran dry.β€’ Of the 4,190,000 households entitled to rent rebates only 2,930,000 received them.β€’ It was something connected with three students who rented their house some years ago.
From Longman Business Dictionaryrentrent1 /rent/ verb1[intransitive, transitive]PROPERTY to pay a regular amount of money for the use of something such as a house or officeThe company had been renting for seven years before buying a 13,000-square-foot headquarters.Businesses can rent PCs to alleviate peak workloads.rent something from somebodyWho do you rent the shop from?2[transitive] (also rent something → out)COMMERCE to allow someone to use something in return for paymentvideo stores that rent Nintendo gamesthe lucrative business of renting out trailers and trucksrent something to somebodyA New York dealer rented an Avis car to an unauthorized driver.Many people trying to sell their second homes have decided to rent them out to tourists instead.3[transitive] especially American EnglishCOMMERCE to pay money for the use of something owned by someone else for a short period of time SYN hire BrETravelers prefer to rent cars with low mileage.4[intransitive]PROPERTY if a house, office etc rents at or rents for a particular amount of money, that is how much it costs to use itThe new units are renting for £350 a month or less. —rented adjective [only before a noun]living inrented accommodation→ See Verb tablerentrent2 nounPROPERTY1[countable, uncountable] money paid for the use of a house, office etcCommercial rents have decreased significantly over the last few years. → fair rent → ground rent → net rent → peppercorn rent → rack rent2for rent available to be rentedThere is a lack of affordable housing for rent.
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.
Verb table
rent
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyrent
he, she, itrents
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyrented
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave rented
he, she, ithas rented
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad rented
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill rent
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have rented
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam renting
he, she, itis renting
> View More
you, we, theyare renting
Past
I, he, she, itwas renting
you, we, theywere renting
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been renting
he, she, ithas been renting
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been renting
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be renting
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been renting
> View Less