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Date: 1400-1500
Language: Old French
Origin: reproche, from reprochier 'to reproach', from Vulgar Latin repropiare, from Latin prope 'near'

reproach

1 noun
     
re‧proach1 formal
1 [uncountable] criticism, blame, or disapproval:
'You don't need me,' she said quietly, without reproach.
2 [countable] a remark that expresses criticism, blame, or disapproval:
He argued that the reproaches were unfair.
3

above/beyond reproach

impossible to criticize [= perfect]:
His behaviour throughout this affair has been beyond reproach.
4

a reproach to somebody/something

something that should make a person, society etc feel bad or ashamed:
These derelict houses are a reproach to the city.

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