Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1300-1400
Language: Latin
Origin: resistere, from sistere 'to stop'

resist

verb
     
reā€§sist W3
1 [intransitive,transitive usually in negatives] to stop yourself from having something that you like very much or doing something that you want to do
cannot resist (doing) something
I just can't resist chocolate.
She can never resist buying new shoes.
it is hard/difficult/impossible to resist something
It's hard to resist an invitation like that.
resist the temptation/urge to do something
She resisted the temptation to laugh.
They only wanted 3 dollars for it, so how could I resist?
2 [transitive] to try to prevent a change from happening, or prevent yourself from being forced to do something:
He resisted pressure to resign.
resist doing something
For months the company has resisted changing its accounts system.
strongly/fiercely/vigorously etc resist
The proposal was strongly resisted by the police.
3 [intransitive and transitive] to use force to stop something from happening
strongly/fiercely/firmly etc resist
Demonstrators violently resisted attempts to remove them from the building.
He was charged with trying to resist arrest.
4 [transitive] to not be changed or harmed by something:
your ability to resist infection

Dictionary pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
What is the word for picture 1? What is the word for picture 2? What is the word for picture 3? What is the word for picture 4?
Click on any of the pictures above to find out what it is called.

Explore our topic dictionary