English version

rhythmic

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishrhythmicrhyth‧mic /ˈrɪðmɪk/ ●○○ (also rhythmical /-mɪkəl/) adjective 🔊 🔊 SOUNDhaving a strong rhythm 🔊 the rhythmic thud of the bass drumrhythmically /-kli/ adverb
Examples from the Corpus
rhythmicthe rhythmic beat of the horses hoovesMoreover, these four hugely wheeling winds resound with rhythmic echoes from realms that can not be directly known.As soon as the rhythmic motion of the cart began Willie fell into a disjointed sleep.The note patternings are really very simple in rhythmic outline, very closely resembling those of early choral music.Serial melody of a traditional character clearly needs rhythmic outlines of conventional shape.A body of soldiers in sports kit marched past at a slow, rhythmic pace, singing loudly.By means of added rhythmic patterns in chords and arpeggios it can fill out the music to enhance the singing of a congregation.Once they had done this, they used breathing and rhythmic rattling to induce trance states.
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