Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Language: Old English
Origin:

ripe

adjective
     
Related topics: Tastes, Food, Plants, Crops
ripe comparative riper, superlative ripest
1HBPTAC ripe fruit or crops are fully grown and ready to eat [≠ unripe]:
Those tomatoes aren't ripe yet.
2

be ripe for something

to be ready for a change to happen, especially when it should have happened sooner:
The police forces are ripe for reform.
The former dock area is ripe for development.
3

the time is ripe (for something)

used to say it is a very suitable time for something to happen, especially when it should have happened sooner:
The time is ripe for a review of progress up to now.
4

ripe old age

a) if you live to a ripe old age, you are very old when you die:
Eat less and exercise more if you want to live to a ripe old age.
b) used to show that you find it surprising or impressive that someone is doing something or has achieved something at a very young age - used humorously:
She was put in charge at the ripe old age of twenty-nine.
5CTDF ripe cheese has developed a strong taste and is ready to eat [= mature]
6 especially British English a ripe smell is strong and unpleasant - used humorously:
We were pretty ripe after a week of walking.
ripeness noun [uncountable]

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