English version

rung

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishrungrung1 /rʌŋ/ verb 🔊 🔊 SLGx-refthe past participle of ring2
Examples from the Corpus
rung• Shortly after the rising bell had been rung, Ethel and Mildred were waiting anxiously outside Miss Hardbroom's door.• Nadine had rung Matthew several times recently-and always at school-to say that Rory was playing truant.• That was what had rung the bell.• Wally had rung to say that it was black tie, and he'd forgotten to tell Debbie.• Cambridge School had a bell which was never rung, which had never been rung.• There had been no more calls since the informant had rung with the news of the cocaine shipment.
rungrung2 noun [countable] 🔊 🔊 1 TZone of the bars that form the steps of a ladder2 informalHIGH POSITION OR RANK a particular level or position in an organization or systemrung of/on 🔊 Humans are on the highest rung of the evolutionary ladder.
Examples from the Corpus
rung• Rung by rung, she crept up the ladder.• Community colleges are the bottom rung of the state's higher education ladder.• He wagged his muddy boots, feeling uncertainly for each rung of the ladder: he had clearly been drinking already.• This is the bottom of the labor movement, eight rungs below Lynn Williams, nine rungs below Kleiman or Connerton.• She eased herself down a few rungs, praying it wouldn't collapse under her.• I stand up and begin to look for the invisible rung.• And so I decided to climb up the ladder of City College, starting at the lowest rung.• As companies view for ever-larger market shares, competition seeps down to the lowliest rung on the ladder.• The rungs were steel knives, blades up.rung of/on• Some come like Marmeladov to get a job on the appropriate rung of the bureaucratic ladder.• With fewer rungs on the ladder, people have to learn to move sideways.• Cooley warns that one should go slowly and not slip at the last rung of the ladder.• As companies view for ever-larger market shares, competition seeps down to the lowliest rung on the ladder.• In the spring they would move up one rung on the remedial ladder.• Misery and misfortune are not misery and misfortune alone but the rungs of a ladder up which man makes his ascent.• It seemed to take for ever to get up that face, like climbing the rungs of Jacob's ladder.• Everyone who is ahead of me is hanging on like crazy to their rung of the ladder.
From Longman Business Dictionaryrungrung /rʌŋ/ noun [countable usually singular]HUMAN RESOURCES a particular level or position in an organization or systemShe is already on the highest rung of the salary scale.
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