English version

savage

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Anthropology
savagesav‧age1 /ˈsævɪdʒ/ ●○○ adjective  1 violentCRUELVIOLENT very violent or cruel syn vicious a savage dog a savage murdersee thesaurus at violent2 criticizingCRITICIZE criticizing someone or something very severely opp mild a savage attack on the government3 severeHARM/BE BAD FOR very severe The government has announced savage cuts in spending. a savage storm4 people [only before noun] old-fashioned not politeSAINSULT an offensive word used to describe people who have a simple traditional way of lifeprimitivea savage tribesavagely adverb He was savagely attacked and beaten.savageness noun [uncountable]
Examples from the Corpus
savageFussell described the war as 'appallingly cruel and savage.'Daniels was found dead in his apartment, the victim of a savage beating.At night, packs of savage dogs roamed the streets.There was savage fighting in and around the eastern border towns.Police are hunting the savage killer of five men in South London.savage tax increasesThey caught the monkey, but it was so savage that no one could get near enough to feed it.a savage warrior
Related topics: Anthropology
savagesavage2 noun [countable] old-fashioned not polite  SAINSULTa very offensive word for someone who has a simple traditional way of life
Examples from the Corpus
savageThe movie reinforces the stereotype of Indians as heathens and savages.
savagesavage3 verb [transitive]  1 ATTACKif an animal such as a dog savages someone, it attacks them and injures them badly syn maul2 CRITICIZEto criticize someone or something very severely syn attack The prime minister was savaged by the press for failing to take action quickly enough.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
savageThere were some who said he was a man whose children had been savaged by a local hound.However, Brightman's performance was savaged by critics.The office door shuddered behind her, and a baying, as of hounds savaging each other, filled the suddenly silent wards.Time and again he is savaged for speaking on subjects about which his critics claim he knows nothing.He would insist to his dying day that an arctic wolf had savaged him.But after critics savaged his second symphony, Elgar became deeply depressed and never wrote another major work.Stevens was savaged in the sports press after his defeat.His jibe was greeted with howls of laughter as Mr Smith savaged Mr Major during the emergency debate on the economy.Troops savaged the weakened enemy army.Not unnaturally, Ministers have savaged the workings of a property tax ever since rates were abolished.
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Verb table
savage
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theysavage
he, she, itsavages
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theysavaged
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave savaged
he, she, ithas savaged
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad savaged
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill savage
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have savaged
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam savaging
he, she, itis savaging
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you, we, theyare savaging
Past
I, he, she, itwas savaging
you, we, theywere savaging
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been savaging
he, she, ithas been savaging
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been savaging
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be savaging
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been savaging
> View Less