English version

seasick

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Illness & disability
seasicksea‧sick /ˈsiːˌsɪk/ adjective  MIfeeling ill when you travel in a boat, because of the movement of the boat in the waterget/feel/be seasick Hal was seasick almost at once.seasickness noun [uncountable]
Examples from the Corpus
seasickAlec liked sailing more than I. I got seasick.By the end of the day they were both suffering from a mild bout of sunstroke and were also feeling a little seasick.Are you seasick after a sip of white wine?Chester and the Wordsworths were violently seasick almost at once.They had always found buccaneering terribly alarming, and felt seasick at the slightest sign of bad weather.Mendelssohn was seasick both ways on the trip by boat from Glasgow to Staffa.It sounds like a landfall you might make after a long and seasick voyage.What a relief then to read Charles Dickens's description of the miseries of feeling seasick without actually being sick.get/feel/be seasickAlec liked sailing more than I. I got seasick.Millie does it all the time and I get seasick.My wife Terrie was feeling seasick.And you were seasick and there was no wind.They had always found buccaneering terribly alarming, and felt seasick at the slightest sign of bad weather.You could get seasick at the top watching the clouds scudding across a full moon in a vast ocean of space.Mendelssohn was seasick both ways on the trip by boat from Glasgow to Staffa.
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.