English version

shorthand

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishshorthandshort‧hand /ˈʃɔːthænd $ ˈʃɔːrt-/ noun [uncountable]  1 BWRITEa fast method of writing using special signs or shorter forms to represent letters, words, and phrasesin shorthand The reporter took notes in shorthand. a secretary who takes shorthand (=writes in shorthand) longhand2 a shorter but less clear way of saying somethingshorthand for He’s been ‘relocated’, which is shorthand for ‘given a worse job a long way away’.
Examples from the Corpus
shorthandMore important was the style of dancing which was now defined by a shorthand record of steps.It is an acceptable shorthand if we understand by it that students learn how to form a relationship with what they learn.If your missive is addressed to your colleagues, then jargon may be acceptable shorthand.What seem the simplest phrases in journalese shorthand can be very confusing.Jargon is an effective form of shorthand, provided everyone understands it.Candidates may use any system of shorthand writing.That is a reasonable shorthand for the problems that have recently rocked the so-called Republican revolution.It is unfortunate that shorthand here makes Lewis imply that the life of submission to Grace is a course of self-improvement.in shorthandThe notes from the meeting were written in shorthand.
From Longman Business Dictionaryshorthandshort‧hand /ˈʃɔːthændˈʃɔːrt-/ noun1[uncountable] a fast method of writing using special signs or shorter forms to represent letters, words, and phrasesMary was taking shorthand (=making notes in shorthand).2[singular, uncountable] a shorter but less clear way of saying somethingScientific jargon uses a shorthand of technical words and phrases.shorthand forThe term ‘one-parent family’ is misleading shorthand for a variety of situations.
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