English version

sinecure

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishsinecuresi‧ne‧cure /ˈsaɪnɪkjʊə, ˈsɪn- $ -kjʊr/ noun [countable] formal 🔊 🔊 JOB/WORKa job which you get paid for even though you do not have to do very much work
Examples from the Corpus
sinecureIt was not long before the Princess proved that her patronage was not intended as a sinecure.The schoolmaster's appointment was at times treated as a sinecure for the vicar of Evenley, a Magdalen living.Barnes railway bridge was a sinecure compared with the limbo of the Willesden Marshalling Yards.This lucrative sinecure was owned from 1554 to 1723 by the Thurn-Taxis family.Both categories could keep any number of sinecures with their permitted number of cures.Among the sinecures were chiefly the remaining canonries in cathedrals and colleges.
From Longman Business Dictionarysinecuresi‧ne‧cure /ˈsaɪnɪkjʊə, ˈsɪn--kjʊr/ noun [countable]JOB a job which you get paid for even though you do not have to do very muchThe bureaucrats saw their sinecures endangered by the demand for efficiency.
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