English version

skilled

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Employment, Industry
skilledskilled /skΙͺld/ ●●○ adjective πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 GOOD ATsomeone who is skilled has the training and experience that is needed to do something well opp unskilled πŸ”Š Skilled craftsmen, such as carpenters, are in great demand. πŸ”Š The company is fortunate to have such highly skilled workers.skilled at/in πŸ”Š She’s very skilled at dealing with the public. πŸ”Š The school offers a program for students who are skilled in metalwork.β–Ί see thesaurus at skilful2 BETI[usually before noun] skilled work needs people with special abilities or training to do it opp unskilled πŸ”Š Bricklaying is very skilled work.
Examples from the Corpus
skilledβ€’ The hallmark of the industrial revolution has been the slow replacement of the unskilled by the skilled.β€’ As is typical of most women's paid employment, this work is not considered particularly skilled and wages are low.β€’ I have a friend at Sotheby's, who is sending a skilled art packer to box up these things tomorrow.β€’ Our advisors are skilled at dealing with financial problems.β€’ There is a demand for carpenters and other skilled craftsmen.β€’ Many Silicon Valley companies are growing so fast, they are eager to build a skilled high-tech workforce.β€’ Shoeing a horse is a skilled job, and no unskilled person should try it.β€’ Instead, we imprisoned thousands of skilled people, and thousands more fled in terror.β€’ Nevertheless, as in many other situations the analyst, himself a skilled performer, has some success in practice.β€’ Alyse was a skilled rider and tried to help me with my technique, but I never excelled.β€’ Keeping highly skilled sailors in the Navy is a priority.β€’ More women are entering skilled trades such as carpentry and cooking.β€’ There is a shortage of skilled workers in the area.β€’ This mechanisation helped the skilled workers to increase production rapidly and to produce the cloth more cheaply.skilled at/inβ€’ The effect of this is to give the advantage to the person who is skilled at calling names.β€’ The whole family was skilled in handling horses.β€’ These payments were equivalent to those made to specialists who were skilled in influencing demons and spirits.β€’ Those who had perfected the machines gave way to those skilled at rounding up the public.β€’ Although she has no formal speech training, she is skilled at the lectern.β€’ Hence, head office attracts the power brokers skilled in the politics of resource allocation.β€’ The valleys began to fill rapidly with people who became skilled in the textile industry.β€’ If the anxiety does not diminish, more emotional probing may need to take place with some one skilled in this area.
From Longman Business Dictionaryskilledskilled /skΙͺld/ adjectiveHUMAN RESOURCES1someone who is skilled has the training and experience that is needed to do something wellSkilled craftsmen, such as carpenters, bricklayers etc, are in great demand.Medical technology companies face a serious shortage of skilled labor (=workers with special skills) in the next decade.In a more technological society, there will be an increased demand for a skilled workforce.skilled at/inShe’s very skilled at dealing with members of the public.2work that is skilled needs special abilities or training in order to do itBricklaying is very skilled work. β†’ compare semi-skilled, unskilled
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