English version

slack

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishslackslack1 /slΓ¦k/ adjective πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 LOOSEhanging loosely, or not pulled tight opp taut πŸ”Š Keep the rope slack until I tell you to pull it.2 BUSY/HAVE A LOT TO DOwith less business activity than usual syn slow πŸ”Š Business remained slack throughout the day.3 CARELESSnot taking enough care or making enough effort to do things correctly – used to show disapproval syn careless πŸ”Š Slack defending by Real Madrid allowed Manchester United to score. β€”slackly adverb β€”slackness noun [uncountable]
Examples from the Corpus
slackβ€’ The fan belt is a little slack.β€’ The report criticized airport security as "disgracefully slack."β€’ I let the rope go slack as the boat came closer.β€’ Corporate profits have been hurt by slack demand.β€’ She didn't want to come against the flat slack flesh.β€’ This can result due to reductions in overmanning and improvements in other types of slack management procedures.β€’ If the rope between climbers is slack, one slip can be fatal.β€’ Savings and loan institutions, for example, were once high slack systems, and appropriately so in a regulated industry.β€’ Today a changing environment has forced many such organization either to become low slack systems or to go out of business.β€’ Keep the rope slack till I say `pull'.β€’ Her body went momentarily slack with relief, or was it disappointment?
slackslack2 noun πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 β†’ take up/pick up the slack2 [uncountable]LOOSE part of a rope that is not stretched tight3 [uncountable]AVAILABLE money, space, people, or time that an organization or person has available, but is not using fully πŸ”Š There is still some slack in the budget.4 β†’ cut/give somebody some slack5 β†’ slacks6 [uncountable] British English very small pieces of coal
Examples from the Corpus
slackβ€’ An ordinary plaid blouse, and slacks, I decide.β€’ He wore a short-sleeved shirt and pale cinnamon slacks.β€’ The idea of Jim Morrison in a pair of black cotton slacks doesn't quite have the same ring, does it?β€’ Leave a little slack in the line.β€’ The workforce has been reduced, so there's very little slack in the system.β€’ People in San Francisco seem to have no slack in their lives anymore.β€’ Therese was huddled in nearly every garment she possessed, slacks, jumpers, her shabby grey coat and the multicoloured shawl.β€’ Hand coils create unwanted slack and immediately tighten around the hand under load, trapping the fingers and preventing an effective arrest.β€’ Sheila sauntered in wearing slacks and an artificial-silk print blouse with a bow at around 7: 30.β€’ Lucy never wore slacks or make-up, except when he permitted it in order to cover a bruise.
slackslack3 (also slack off) verb [intransitive] πŸ”Š πŸ”Š WORK HARDto make less effort than usual, or to be lazy in your work πŸ”Š He was accused of slacking and taking too many holidays.β†’ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
slackβ€’ She called me into her office and accused me of slacking and taking too many holidays!β€’ The horse slacked his pace, swung his neck down to ease the tension in it, and relaxed his tail.β€’ It did not slack in the least until Centreville was reached.β€’ I guess I thought that since everything was starting to turn around, I could slack off a little.β€’ A lifetime of low-level employment is a high price to pay for slacking off in junior high.β€’ Antonio Ramos, a mariachi since he turned 12, has seen the work for mariachis slack off too.β€’ This is no time to be slacking off!β€’ But Le CarrΓ©'s not slacking off.β€’ "You start tomorrow at nine, " he told them, "and no slacking, or there'll be trouble."
From Longman Business Dictionaryslackslack1 /slΓ¦k/ adjective1COMMERCEa slack period of time is one with less business activity than usualBusiness is slack just now.The workers feared being laid off (=losing their jobs) in slack periods.2if someone is being slack, they are not taking enough care or making enough effort to do things rightThe report criticized airport security as β€œdisgracefully slack”.High prices and the absence of competition may make firms slack in their use of resources. β€”slackness noun [uncountable]the slackness of the London market at presentThe report accuses the government of slackness.slackslack2 (also slack off) verb [intransitive] to make less of an effort than usual or be lazy in your workHe was accused of slacking and taking too many holidays.β†’ See Verb tableslackslack3 noun [uncountable] money, space, or people that an organization is not using at present, but could use in the futureThere is very little slack in the training budget for this year.
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.
Verb table
slack
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyslack
he, she, itslacks
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyslacked
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave slacked
he, she, ithas slacked
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad slacked
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill slack
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have slacked
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam slacking
he, she, itis slacking
> View More
you, we, theyare slacking
Past
I, he, she, itwas slacking
you, we, theywere slacking
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been slacking
he, she, ithas been slacking
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been slacking
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be slacking
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been slacking
> View Less