Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1600-1700
Origin: Probably from a Scandinavian language

slam

1 verb
     
slam1 past tense and past participle slammed, present participle slamming
1

door etc

[intransitive and transitive] if a door, gate etc slams, or if someone slams it, it shuts with a loud noise [= bang]:
We heard a car door slam.
He slammed the door shut.
2

put something somewhere

[transitive always + adverb/preposition] to put something on or against a surface with a fast violent movement
slam something down/against/onto
Henry slammed the phone down angrily.
3

hit with force

[intransitive always + adverb/preposition] to hit or attack someone or something with a lot of force
slam into/against etc
All 155 passengers died instantly when the plane slammed into the mountain.
4

criticize

[transitive] to criticize someone or something strongly - used especially in newspapers [= slate]:
Local media slammed plans to build a prison in the area.
slam somebody for something
The council was slammed for its unfair selection procedure.
5

slam on the brakes

TTC to make a car stop very suddenly by pressing the brakes very hard
6

slam the door in somebody's face

a) to close a door hard when someone is trying to come in
b) to rudely refuse to meet someone or talk to them

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