Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1400-1500
Language: Dutch
Origin: Low German snappen

snap

1 verb
     
Related topics: Photography
snap1 W3 past tense and past participle snapped, present participle snapping
1

break

[intransitive and transitive] to break with a sudden sharp noise, or to make something break with a sudden sharp noise:
A twig snapped under my feet.
The wind snapped branches and power lines.
snap (something) off (something)
I snapped the ends off the beans and dropped them into a bowl.
snap (something) in two/in half (=break into two pieces)
The teacher snapped the chalk in two and gave me a piece.
2

move into position

[intransitive,transitive always + adverb/preposition]XX to move into a particular position suddenly, making a short sharp noise, or to make something move like this
snap together/back etc
The pieces just snap together like this.
The policeman snapped the handcuffs around her wrist.
snap (something) open/shut
She snapped her briefcase shut.
3

say something angrily

[intransitive and transitive] to say something quickly in an angry way:
'What do you want?' Mike snapped.
snap at
He snapped at Walter for no reason.
4

become angry/anxious etc

[intransitive] to suddenly stop being able to control your anger, anxiety, or other feelings in a difficult situation:
The stress began to get to her, and one morning she just snapped.
Something inside him snapped and he hit her.
5

animal

[intransitive] if an animal such as a dog snaps, it tries to bite you
snap at
The dog started snapping at my heels.
6

photograph

[intransitive and transitive] informalTCP to take a photograph:
Dave snapped a picture of me and Sonia.
7

snap your fingers

to make a short, sharp noise by moving one of your fingers quickly against your thumb, for example in order to get someone's attention or to mark the beat of music
8

snap to it

spoken used to tell someone to hurry and do something immediately:
Come on, snap to it, get that room cleaned up!
9

stop

[transitive] American English to end a series of events - used especially in newspapers:
The Rockets snapped a seven-game losing streak by beating Portland.
10

snap to attention

PMA if soldiers snap to attention, they suddenly stand very straight

snap on/off

phrasal verb
to switch something on or off, or to switch on or off
snap something ↔ on/off
Kathy snapped off the light.
A light snapped on in one of the huts.

snap out of something

phrasal verb
to stop being sad or upset and make yourself feel better:
Chantal's been depressed for days. I wish she'd snap out of it.

snap somebody/something ↔ up

phrasal verb
1 to buy something immediately, especially because it is very cheap:
People were snapping up bargains.
2 to eagerly take an opportunity to have someone as part of your company, team etc:
Owen was snapped up by Liverpool before he'd even left school.
WORD FOCUS: break WORD FOCUS: break
smash with a lot of force
shatter
into many pieces
split
into two pieces
snap
into two pieces, with a sudden loud noise
tear
paper/cloth
burst
pipe/tyre/balloon
crumble
break into a lot of small pieces
disintegrate
break into a lot of small pieces and be destroyed
fracture
if a bone fractures or you fracture it, it breaks slightly so that a small line appears on the surface


See also
break

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