English version

spillover

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishspilloverspill‧o‧ver /ˈspɪloʊvə $ -oʊvər/ noun [countable, uncountable] 🔊 🔊 the effect that one situation or problem has on another situation 🔊 Not all of the violence in Miami was spillover from the trial.spillover effect/benefit/cost 🔊 The weak European economy will have a spillover effect on the US dollar.
Examples from the Corpus
spilloverD1 is drawn to include these private benefits plus the additional spillover benefits accruing to society at large.Such benefits and costs are called spillover or external benefits and costs.If the hepatic capacity to eliminate portal endotoxins is exceeded, spillover into the systemic circulation will occur.More important, perhaps, was the notion of political spillover.In a functional sense, spillover was founded on the belief that contemporary economies were based upon a tangle of interrelated sectors.The spillover from this popularity also affected other types of historicals.The paucity of cases emphasises the difficulty of virus spillover into the urban cycle.spillover effect/benefit/costWhat divergences arise between equilibrium and optimal output when a spillover costs and b spillover benefits are present?D1 is drawn to include these private benefits plus the additional spillover benefits accruing to society at large.By polluting, that is, by creating spillover costs, the firm enjoys lower production costs and the supply curve 5.Correcting for spillover benefits How might the underallocation of resources associated with the presence of spillover benefits be corrected?Education is another standard example of spillover benefits.The most obvious examples of spillover costs involve environmental pollution.Government might levy a specific tax which equals or approximates the spillover costs per unit of output.
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