English version

spiral

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Shapes, patterns
spiralspi‧ral1 /ˈspaɪərəl $ ˈspaɪr-/ ●○○ noun [countable]  1 CFTURNa line in the form of a curve that winds around a central point, moving further away from the centre all the time2 a process, usually a harmful one, in which something gradually but continuously gets worse or betterin/into a spiral Unemployment rose and the city went into a spiral of decline.downward/upward spiral The company is in a downward spiral.3 inflationary spiralspiral adjective
Examples from the Corpus
spiralIt has continued on that downward spiral since.Self-pity tends to block taking action that will be truly effective in reversing the downward spirals of primary and family diseases.Perhaps the most shocking news was that children got hit the hardest in this downward spiral.It is difficult to cook the inside spirals because of the filling so this extra time is important.downward/upward spiralAfter an unfortunate and ill-timed brush with the law, it was almost impossible for Marinello to arrest his downward spiral.My theory is we're going into this horrible downward spiral and Clinton is a poor imitation of Kennedy.It has continued on that downward spiral since.At that point, however, the still increasing emissions of carbon dioxide will begin the upward spiral once more.This has been particularly true of the hi-tech sector, hence the downward spiral in share prices.Obviously the past year I somehow got on the downward spiral at work.Self-pity tends to block taking action that will be truly effective in reversing the downward spirals of primary and family diseases.Perhaps the most shocking news was that children got hit the hardest in this downward spiral.
spiralspiral2 verb (spiralled, spiralling British English, spiraled, spiraling American English) [intransitive]  1 [always + adverb/preposition]TURN to move in a continuous curve that gets nearer to or further from its central point as it goes roundspiral to/around etc The damaged plane spiralled to the ground.2 if a situation spirals, it gets worse, more violent etc in a way that cannot be controlled Crime has spiraled out of control.3 INCREASE IN NUMBER OR AMOUNTif debt or the cost of something spirals, it increases quickly in a way that cannot be controlled syn escalatespiralling British English, spiraling American English adjective the spiralling cost of legal services→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
spiralSince the project started five years ago, costs have spiralled.At a more complex psychological level, motion that spirals clockwise connects us to the Sun.We watched the leaves spiral down from the trees in the cold autumn wind.However, Clinton has disregarded the debt ceiling law, allowing the nation to spiral further into debt.With inflation spiralling out of control, the country was close to economic collapse.Too much was happening that he couldn't explain, things were spiralling out of his control.A black whirlwind, they fill the air with the click of leathery wings as they spiral through the trees.Entranced, she watched herself watching them as they spiralled to earth around her.Smoke spiralled upward from the chimney.spiral to/around etcStarting from the centre, pipe in an outward spiral to cover the pies.Entranced, she watched herself watching them as they spiralled to earth around her.The dark galaxy spiralled around her, each constellation pricked out in delicate shades of fragrance.But he ignored them, leaping straight up the spiral to his father's room.First there was a sharp rise in the price of foodstuffs, spiralling to hyperinflation.What Smith doesn't make clear is how we might get from the present destructive spiral to the moneyless system he advocates.
From Longman Business Dictionaryspiralspi‧ral1 /ˈspaɪərəlˈspaɪr-/ noun [countable] a process, usually a harmful one, in which something continuously rises, falls, gets worse etc, often starting off slowly but gradually speeding up until it is out of controlSales are on a downward spiral.The current oil price rise may cause an inflationary spiral and, in the end, a recession. wage-price spiralspiralspiral2 verb (spiralled, spiralling British English, spiraled, spiraling) American English [intransitive] if debt or the cost of something spirals, it increases quickly and uncontrollablySpiralling costs may force staff cuts.Inflation is spiralling out of control.→ See Verb table
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.
Verb table
spiral
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyspiral
he, she, itspirals
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyspiralled (BrE)
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave spiralled
he, she, ithas spiralled
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad spiralled
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill spiral
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have spiralled
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam spiralling
he, she, itis spiralling
> View More
you, we, theyare spiralling
Past
I, he, she, itwas spiralling
you, we, theywere spiralling
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been spiralling
he, she, ithas been spiralling
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been spiralling
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be spiralling
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been spiralling
> View Less