English version

split

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Groupings
splitsplit1 /splɪt/ ●●● S2 W3 verb (past tense and past participle split, present participle splitting)  1 disagree [intransitive, transitive]PPGSEPARATE if a group of people splits, or if it is split, people in the group disagree strongly with each other and the group sometimes divides into separate smaller groups It was feared that the issue would split the church.be split on/over something The party is split over the issue of immigration. The government appears deeply split on this issue.split from The Pan-Africanist Congress split from the ANC in 1959.split something in two/down the middle The war has split the nation in two.see thesaurus at break, separate, tear2 separate into parts (also split up) [intransitive, transitive]SEPARATE to divide or separate something into different parts or groups, or to be divided into different parts or groupssplit into Can you split into groups of three now?split something into something The book is split into six sections.3 break or tear [intransitive, transitive]BREAKTEAR if something splits, or if you split it, it tears or breaks along a straight line The branch split under their weight. One of the boxes had split open.split (something) in two/half The board had split in two. Split the pineapple down the middle.4 share [transitive]SHARE to divide something into separate parts and share it between two or more peoplesplit something between somebody/something Profits will be split between three major charities.split something with somebody He agreed to sell the car and split the proceeds with his brother.split something three/four etc ways (=share something between three, four etc people or groups) The money will have to be split three ways. We agreed to split the cost.5 injure [transitive]CUT to make someone’s head or lip have a cut in it, as a result of a fall or hit She fell against a table and split her lip. The force of the blow nearly split his head open.6 end relationship (also split up) [intransitive] informal if people split, they end a marriage or relationship with each othersplit with/from He split from his wife last year. The band split two years ago.7 leave [intransitive] old-fashioned informalLEAVE A PLACE to leave a place quickly Come on – let’s split.8 split hairs9 split the difference10 split your sides split off split on somebody split up
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Examples from the Corpus
splitThe window frames are old and the wood is starting to split.These shoes are so old the canvas had split.About a mile in, the canyon splits.The plague spreads: more atoms split, and then yet more.He said that the land should be split between his four sons.Highly monochromatic laser light is split by the mirror M to travel along the two arms.At first, her earnings were split down the middle with her agent.Typical projects are expected to be split fairly evenly between hardware, software and services.This phrase always intrigued Bob; as if the speaker could split herself in two, providing a doppelganger companion.He bent down and split his trousers.The back of the chair had split in two.The more l-e spoke, the more he felt he was softly split in two.The class split into two. Half of us went to the museum and half to the cathedral.The debate over the use of military force has split legal scholars.She learned to split logs and stack a woodpile.His head was split open in the accident.A metal tube split open in the steam generator of the nuclear power plant.Hudson's coat had split right up the back.Rutherford first split the atom on 3rd January 1919.For this exercise, I'm going to split the class into three groups.He split the company in half, and then sold both new companies to different buyers.The US is hoping to split the cost of developing the new plane with Japan.My father and Mr Calder agreed to split the cost of repairs to the Wrights' car.Feelings about the war split the country right down the middle.Split the leek in half lengthwise, and cut it into 1/4-inch pieces.They planned to rob a bank, split the money, and leave the country.I think we should split whatever we get four ways.split fromBrothers and sisters were quite often split from each other, as well as losing parents, in these moments of crisis.He said she was jealous that her husband had taken another girlfriend and was encouraged to split from him by her parents.First Henman split from his long-time coach David Felgate, with both parties insisting it was an amicable parting.He's also split from his wife Becky and she has custody of their son.She split from husband John James four weeks ago.The left wing of the party is likely to split from its parent organization.The base split from side to side but fortunately the water only seeped out.Though the group split from the company in 1969, the strong pro-pharmaceutical spirit lingers.Last year, he split from the rock band, "Hot City'.Gabriel, who split from the supergroup in 1975, claims his career has suffered because of his association with the band.split something into somethingRoss split the department into ten teams to work on the project.Split ... down the middleBut initial reactions aren't always right and it seems to me that people are split down the middle.Her bottom lip is fat and purple and there's a split down the middle.I wonder will his loyalties be split down the middle!Those whose main interest was Soviet Jewry were split down the middle.Until the motion was tabled, the 480-seat lower house of parliament appeared to be split down the middle.We split you down the middle.split the costIn many cases, couples sharing a mortgage are likely to split the costs in half.Afterward, the city and the port would split the cost of disposing the ground water.Our parents split the cost of our tuition and housing.Another idea is to split the cost of radio adverts.My father and Mr Calder agreed to split the cost of repairs to the Wrights' car.split ... head openWhat if Lucy had split her head open again?split with/fromHer split with Breen, who now skates with 17-year-old Kate Robinson, was amicable.The division of booster-club funds after the split from Desert Devils almost forced a lawsuit.By the end of World War I, however, she faced a widening split with her radical allies.Captain Farquhar, who farms at Tormarton, near Badminton, Avon, split from his wife towards the end of 1991.Both the main parties were split with Labour more favourable to television than the Conservatives.The base split from side to side but fortunately the water only seeped out.Though the group split from the company in 1969, the strong pro-pharmaceutical spirit lingers.It was just after eleven when I made the conifer where I'd split from Werewolf.
splitsplit2 ●○○ noun [countable]  1 tearHOLE a tear or crack in something made of cloth, wood etcsplit in a long split in the sleeve of his coat2 disagreementARGUE a serious disagreement that divides an organization or group of people into smaller groups syn riftsplit in/within The argument could lead to a damaging split in the party. a deep split within the governmentsplit between a split between the radicals and the moderates within the groupsplit over The union is desperate to avoid a split over this issue.3 end of relationship informal the end of a marriage or relationship – used especially in newspapers and magazines rumours of a marriage splitsplit with She seems to be getting over her recent split with her fiancé.4 dividing somethingSHARE the way in which something, especially money, is shared between several people In a publishing deal, the average split used to be 50:50 between writer and publisher.three-way/four-way etc split (=when something is shared equally between three, four etc people) a three-way split in the profits5 separation informalDIFFERENT a clear separation or difference between two thingssplit between the traditional split between the state and church6 do the splits
Examples from the Corpus
splitThere is great danger of a split in the party if a competent leader is not found soon.The new policy has led to a split in the armed forces.From the sound of the word thought it was a split into two personalities.We suddenly noticed there was a split in the side of the tent.a split in the seam of his pantsThere is a deep split in the country over the best way to move forward the peace process.There is a startling split between men's and women's views of sexual harassment.In the unitary and harmonious female Spirit-Self there will be no such splits.The reasons for the split are understandable.The split was formally approved at an extraordinary congress in Prague on Feb. 23.The split reflects a difference of opinion simmering for months within the Republican Party.split in/withinHart timed him in 18. 5, which at the time would have been the fastest 200 split in history.But there is also a feeling that he was manoeuvred out because of a split in the Cardiff camp.Its flowers she stuck through a split in her hat; the rest she tossed aside.Buchanan's jump to the Reform party triggered a split within its ranks.Judge Jackson highlighted government's mediating role when he explained why he ordered the company split in two.It can only happen after a disastrous split in the majority party or when no party has a majority.This split in domestic duties has really come with the baby.This is due inpart to splits within the alternative movement.three-way/four-way etc splitThe stalemate is blamed on a three-way split among panel members about how to save Social Security.She gave ground grudgingly, and we wound up agreeing to a three-way split.
From Longman Business Dictionarysplitsplit1 /splɪt/ verb (past tense and past participle split, present participle splitting)1[transitive] to divide something into separate parts so that two or more people each get a partWe agreed to split the fee.split something betweenThe merger forced us to split operations between London and Edinburgh.split something three/four etc waysAll profits will be split three ways (=into three parts).2[intransitive, transitive] (also split up) to divide or separate something into different parts, or be divided into different partssplit intoThey planned to split into three companies to fight the bid.He plans to split the firm up between his two sons.3split sharesFINANCE to divide a company’s shares into smaller units so that the value of each share is reduced and the number of shares is increased. This may be done to make it easier to buy and sell the sharesThe company is splitting its 5p nominal shares into units of 2.5p to make them more marketable.4split the difference to agree on a price, charge etc that is exactly half-way between the one that has been offered and the one that has been asked for→ See Verb tablesplitsplit2 noun [countable]FINANCE the act of sharing money between a group of people, organizations etc, or the share that each group getsI paid by credit card for two equal split payments.The partners have agreed a three-way split (=a share of something that is divided equally between three people). reverse share split share split
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Verb table
split
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theysplit
he, she, itsplits
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theysplit
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave split
he, she, ithas split
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad split
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill split
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have split
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam splitting
he, she, itis splitting
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you, we, theyare splitting
Past
I, he, she, itwas splitting
you, we, theywere splitting
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been splitting
he, she, ithas been splitting
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been splitting
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be splitting
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been splitting
> View Less